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I would like to know how to interpret the output of the get.edgelist() command in igraph in R.

for example I generate a random graph:

a=erdos.renyi.game(100,0.5, directed=TRUE)
a=get.edgelist(a)

This gives me two columns and I would think that the first one represents nodes and the second the corresponding connections.

But this doesn't seem to be the case because some numbers are only represented in the second column but not the first. How can this be?

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From the man page ?get.edgelist: get.edgelist returns the list of edges in a graph. Meaning they are edges from node a to node b - hence the 2 column matrix. Does this help? –  Arun Jan 22 '13 at 20:51
    
but if then I would expect that if I generate a directed graph then all connection of node 97 should be in the first column but it has fewer than the other nodes. –  user1723765 Jan 22 '13 at 20:58
    
I think you might be mixing up directed and undirected? In a directed graph, an edge goes from one node to the other node, in an undirected graph the direction doesn't matter. –  Marius Jan 22 '13 at 21:03
    
I don't understand your point about all connection of node 97. Could you explain it more? If I understand this method right, an edge is assigned between every pair of nodes with equal probability. You've created a directed graph. And that's what I see. –  Arun Jan 22 '13 at 21:05
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

By creating a small example, probably it becomes obvious?

set.seed(45)
g <- erdos.renyi.game(10, 0.5, directed = TRUE)
> get.adjacency(g)
10 x 10 sparse Matrix of class "dgCMatrix"

 [1,] . 1 . 1 . . 1 1 1 1
 [2,] . . . 1 . 1 1 1 1 .
 [3,] 1 1 . 1 . 1 . . 1 .
 [4,] 1 1 . . . . 1 1 1 1
 [5,] . 1 . . . . 1 . . 1
 [6,] . 1 1 1 1 . 1 . . .
 [7,] 1 . 1 . . 1 . . 1 .
 [8,] . 1 1 1 . 1 . . 1 .
 [9,] 1 . 1 1 . 1 . . . 1
[10,] 1 . 1 . 1 1 . . 1 .

edges <- as.data.frame(get.edgelist(g))
edges <- edges[order(edges$V1, edges$V2), ]
> head(edges, 11)
   V1 V2
7   1  2
18  1  4
34  1  7
39  1  8
42  1  9
1   1 10
19  2  4
28  2  6
35  2  7
40  2  8
43  2  9

You can see from the adjacency matrix that there are edges from row 1 to 2,4,7,8,9,10, which is also reflected in the output from get.edgelist. It gives you exactly what's in the adjacency matrix.

> table(edges$V1)
# 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 
# 6  5  5  6  3  5  4  5  5  5 
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thanks a lot for your help. My problem is that if you look at the remaining numbers in the edgelist above then you find that number 10 only has 5 contacts in column 2 whereas the others have 6. this is what I don't understand –  user1723765 Jan 22 '13 at 21:22
    
I've shown you the number of connections for each node (row in the adjacency matrix) for the example above. It creates a random graph by assigning an edge between two nodes with a probability of 0.5. So, the number of connections will not be ALWAYS 5. If that's what you mean...? –  Arun Jan 22 '13 at 21:30
    
yes. so there is no way to ensure that each node will ALWAYS have 5 but is there a way to ensure that each has AT LEAST 5? –  user1723765 Jan 22 '13 at 21:37
    
Why don't you try increasing the probability like this? g <- erdos.renyi.game(10, p.or.m=.7, directed=T). This gave me > 5 connections for all nodes (Of course this increases the probability of obtaining more connections. Sometimes you still might get < 5 connections, but it would be relatively rare). you can check if its at least 5 by doing table(get.edgelist(g)[,1]) –  Arun Jan 22 '13 at 21:43
    
yes, well the problem is that I would like to look at different probabilities of re-wiring but have for each case above 5 contacts for each agent. I guess I can only achieve that if I increase n. thanks for your help –  user1723765 Jan 22 '13 at 21:52
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