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Context

I am auto-requiring all files in a directory structure via

# base.rb
dir = File.dirname(__FILE__)
path = File.join(dir, '**', '*.rb')
Dir[path].each { |file| require File.expand_path(file, __FILE__) }

and am calling this snippet through a require statement in a separate file, api.rb.

Problem

This code snippet includes itself (base.rb) as well as api.rb.

Question

Is there a 'clean' way to do this type of auto-requiring while dynamically avoiding including the file that has called the auto-require'er (i.e. api.rb)?

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Requiring a file twice, or ten times, won't hurt. Ruby will see the request and will ignore it. Is this causing an error, such as a constant redefinition? –  the Tin Man Jan 22 '13 at 21:11
    
My underlying motivation is that api.rb relies on a number of classes/modules/etc defined throughout the directory structure. So, I use base.rb to require all of the files that api.rb relies on, and then have api.rb require base.rb. I want to avoid having base.rb require api.rb because I want to make sure that api.rb has everything defined that it needs before evaluating it. Doing this manually (e.g. filter out `file =~ \api/.rb`) is relatively straightforward, but I'd much prefer to do this dynamically so I can reuse this code more easily. –  Ethan Jan 22 '13 at 21:25

2 Answers 2

Remember that when you require a file identified by a certain path more than once each subsequent call to require will return false and the file won't be reevaluated. As a result if your base.rb, which requires everything else, is itself required, further attepts to require it should not lead to a reevaluation.

Let's demonstrate it using an example. Create a lib directory with 3 files inside.

# lib/a.rb

  require 'base'
  puts :a

# lib/b.rb

  require 'base'
  puts :b

# lib/base.rb

  $counter ||= 0
  puts "Evaluated base.rb #{$counter += 1} times"
  dir = File.dirname(__FILE__)
  path = File.join(dir, '**', '*.rb')
  Dir[path].each { |file| require File.expand_path file }

Execute lib/base.rb directly. base.rb will be evaluated twice: firstly, when it's executed directly; secondly, when it's required by a.rb. Notice, that it is not evaluated when it's required from b.rb.

$ ruby -I lib lib/base.rb 
Evaluated base.rb 1 times
Evaluated base.rb 2 times
a
b

Compare with requireing it. Now base.rb is evaluated once only, because attempts to require it in a.rb and b.rb were preceded by having the file required using the command line -r switch.

$ ruby -I lib -r base -e 'puts :ok'
Evaluated base.rb 1 times
a
b
ok
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My main concern is in not requiring the file that has required the file that does the auto-requiring of the rest of the directory structure. Any thinking on this part? Thanks for the response. –  Ethan Jan 22 '13 at 20:57

Kernel.caller returns the current execution stack as an array of strings. You can avoid calling require on filenames which you find in that array. Multiple files with the same basename would trip this up. I don't see a way to get a more precise list of ancestor files.

$ head *.rb
==> A.rb <==
require 'base'
puts :A

==> B.rb <==
require 'base'
puts :B

==> CA.rb <==
require 'base'
puts :CA

==> base.rb <==
dir = File.dirname(__FILE__)
path = File.join(dir, '**', '*.rb')
required = caller.map { |frame| /^(.+):\d+:in `require'$/.match(frame) and File.basename $1 }.compact
Dir[path].each { |file| required.include?(File.basename file) or require File.expand_path file }
$ ruby A.rb
B
CA
A
$ ruby B.rb
A
CA
B
$ ruby CA.rb
A
B
CA
$ ruby base.rb
B
CA
A
$
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