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Output I'm getting:

  • The base array
  • 7290 5184 6174 8003 7427 2245 6522 6669 8939 4814 The
  • Sorted array
  • -33686019 2245 4814 5184 6174 6522 6669 7290 7427 8003
  • Press any key to continue . . .

I have no idea where this, -33686019, number is coming from. I've posted all of the code because I really don't know what could be causing it.

The Bubble Sort:

#include "Sorting.h"

double Sorting::bubbleSort( int size )
{
    //Make a copy of our "master key" array for us to sort
    int *toSort = whichArray(size);
    int *theArray = copyArray( toSort, size );  
    double time;

    cout << "The base array" << endl;
    for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++ )
    {
        cout << theArray[i] << endl;
    }

    //The sort

    //Begin time
    timer.startClock();

    bool swapped = true;
    int temp = 0;

    while( swapped == true )
    {
        swapped = false;

        for( int i = 0; i < size; i++ )
        {
            if( theArray[i+1] < theArray[i] )
            {
                /*temp = theArray[i+1];

                theArray[i+1] = theArray[i];
                theArray[i] = temp;*/

                swap(theArray[i + 1], theArray[i]);
                swapped = true;
            }
        }
    }

    time = timer.getTime();

    cout << "The Sorted array" << endl;
    for(int x = 0; x < 10; x++ )
    {
        cout << theArray[x] << endl;
    }

    return time;
}

The Sorting Class:

#ifndef SORTING_H
#define SORTING_H

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
//^For random numbers
#include <iostream>

#include "TimerSystem.h"
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;

class Sorting
{
private:
    //The below pointers will point to arrays that hold the data sets
    int *n10;
    int *n100;
    int *n1000;
    int *n10000;

    TimerSystem timer;

    double runs[4][4];

    public:
    Sorting();
    ~Sorting(){};

    //Testing functions
    void printArray();
    void print2DArray();
    void dryRun();

    //Data manging and creating
    int randomNumGen();
    int* arrayGen( int size );//Returning a pointer
    int* copyArray( int *toCopy, int size );//Makes an array that the program can sort. The leaves the original array intact
    int* whichArray( int size );
    void datasetRun( int whichSort );//Does three runs of a sort and gets the average for all 4 array sizes

    //Sorts
    double bubbleSort( int size );
};

#endif

Other Called Functions:

#include "Sorting.h"

int Sorting::randomNumGen()
{
    int randomNumber = rand() % 10000 + 1;

    if( randomNumber > 10000 || randomNumber < 0 )
    {
        system("pause");
    }

    return randomNumber;
}

int* Sorting::arrayGen( int size )
{
    int *theArray= new int[size];

    for( int i = 0; i < size; i++ )
    {
        theArray[i] = randomNumGen();
    }

    return theArray;
}

int* Sorting::copyArray( int *toCopy, int size )
{
    int *newArray = new int[size];

    for( int i = 0; i < size; i++ )
    {
        newArray[i] = toCopy[i];
    }

    return newArray;
}

int* Sorting::whichArray( int size )
{
    if( size == 10 )
    {
        return n10;
    }
    else if( size == 100 )
    {
        return n100;
    }
    else if( size == 1000 )
    {
        return n100;
    }
    else if( size == 10000 )
    {
        return n1000;
    }

    return NULL;
}

void Sorting::datasetRun( int whichSort )
{
    //1: Bubble 
    //2: Insertion
    //3: Selection
    //4: Shell 
    //5: Quick
    //6: Merge

    int col = 0;
    int row = 0;
    int set = 10;
    bool runDone = false;

    if( whichSort == 1 )
    {
        for( int row = 0; row < 4; row++ )
        {
            for( int col = 0; col < 4; col++ )
            {
                runs[row][col] = bubbleSort( set );
            }

            //set = set * 10;
        }
    }
}

//Constructor
Sorting::Sorting()
{
    //For the random number generator
    srand( time(NULL) );

    n10 = arrayGen( 10 );
    n100 = arrayGen( 100 );
    n1000 = arrayGen( 1000 );
    n10000 = arrayGen( 10000 );
}

//Functions for testing
void Sorting::printArray()
{
    int size = 10000;

    for( int i = 0; i < size; i++ )
    {
        cout << n10000[i] << " ";
    }
}

void Sorting::print2DArray()
{
    for( int height = 0; height < 4; height++ )
    {
        for( int width = 0; width < 4; width++ )
        {
            cout << runs[height][width] << endl;
        }

        cout << "\n\n";
    }
}

The Main Function:

#include "Sorting.h"

void main()
{
    //Makes the numbers easily readable
    cout.setf(ios::fixed | ios::showpoint);
    cout.precision(16);

    Sorting theSorting;

    //theSorting.printArray();

    //cout << theSorting.bubbleSort( 10 ) << endl;

    //theSorting.datasetRun(1);
    //theSorting.print2DArray();

    theSorting.bubbleSort( 10 );

    system("pause");
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Carl Norum, sashoalm, Anders R. Bystrup, hjpotter92, nhahtdh Jan 23 '13 at 10:44

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The following bit is not correct:

for( int i = 0; i < size; i++ )
{
    if( theArray[i+1] < theArray[i] )

It is accessing one beyond the boundary of the array. The for loop should probably be:

for( int i = 0; i < size - 1; i++ )
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much it fixed it!! –  WRX Jan 22 '13 at 21:14

Look at this:

for( int i = 0; i < size; i++ )
    {
        if( theArray[i+1] < theArray[i] )

theArray[i+1] is undefined on the last iteration of the loop.

Change the loop's continuation expression from i < size to i < (size-1)

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, (i + 1) < size would be more unsigned-safe. (unsigned zero minus one equals UINT_MAX). Sizes are often unsigned so this is not superfluous. I try to be in the habit of making the adjustment on the loop counter instead of the loop ending condition. –  doug65536 Jan 22 '13 at 22:57

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