Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have a table with a bunch of dates, e.g.:

declare @tbl table {
    idx int primary key,
    startdate datetime,
    enddate datetime
}

And I want to find the largest set of rows where startdate and enddate intersect (in the real world, the start date and end date represents start and end times for events, and I need to find the maximum # of events occurring simultaneously).

In another programming language I might sort all entries by startdate, then iterate through each entry once, building a temporary set of intersections (keeping track of the largest set generated). But I'm not sure if this is the most efficient way to express this in T-SQL. help!

Oh, and it's SQL Server 2000. :(

share|improve this question
    
Intersections, what do you require, and what have you come up with –  Adriaan Stander Sep 18 '09 at 20:59
    
I think my requirements above are pretty clear. I want the largest set of events that occur simultaneously. Two rows "a" and "b" interesect whens a.startdate <= b.enddate and a.enddate >= b.startdate. every solution I have tried so far has been sort of hacky. that's why I am asking dear lazyweb. :) –  Jen A Sep 18 '09 at 21:05
1  
well based on the question, if you googled, sqlhacks.com/index.php/Dates/Dates would have been there –  Adriaan Stander Sep 18 '09 at 21:18
    
I don't mean to be rude, but none of those links has an answer to my question. And yes, I googled. –  Jen A Sep 18 '09 at 21:28
    
Show some luv, give a small set of data, table structure and a potential query you tried (as i see from posts below (duh???) that you have tried before) and we will try to help... –  Adriaan Stander Sep 18 '09 at 21:31

4 Answers 4

try this (it's close to what you want I think...

Select Distinct EventId 
From EventTable Et
Join  (Select Top 1 RunDate, Count(*) DateCount
       From 
          (Select Distinct StartDate RunDate
           From EventTable
               Union  
           Select Distinct EndDate RunDate
           From EventTable) A
         Join EventTable E
            On A.RunDate Between E.StartDate And E.EndDate
       Group By RunDate
       Order By Count(*) Desc) Z
   On Z.RunDate Between Et.StartDate and Et.EndDate

oh, If your dates have date and Time in them, then replace all the dates herein with actual date portion only (strip off the time)

Select Distinct EventId 
From EventTable Et
Join  (Select Top 1 RunDate, Count(*) DateCount
       From 
          (Select Distinct DateAdd(day, 0, DateDiff(day, 0, StartDate)) RunDate
           From EventTable
               Union  
           Select Distinct DateAdd(day, 0, DateDiff(day, -1, EndDate)) RunDate
           From EventTable) A
         Join EventTable E
            On A.RunDate Between DateAdd(day, 0, DateDiff(day, 0, E.StartDate))
                             and DateAdd(day, 0, DateDiff(day, -1, E.EndDate))
       Group By RunDate
       Order By Count(*) Desc) Z
   On Z.RunDate Between DateAdd(day, 0, DateDiff(day, 0, Et.StartDate))
                    and DateAdd(day, 0, DateDiff(day, -1, Et.EndDate))
share|improve this answer
    
So did this work ?? –  Charles Bretana Sep 19 '09 at 0:28
    
it did, thank you! –  Jen A Sep 21 '09 at 21:27

Updated to remove the union all

declare @tbl table (
idx int identity(1,1) primary key,    
startdate datetime,    
enddate datetime);

insert into @tbl (startdate, enddate) 
select '2009-01-01', '2009-01-05'
union all select '2009-01-02', '2009-01-04'
union all select '2009-01-01', '2009-01-03'
union all select '2009-01-03', '2009-01-06'
union all select '2009-01-04', '2009-01-07'
union all select '2009-01-05', '2009-01-08'

select idx, startdate
   , (select sum(in_or_out) 
from (
   select case when startdate<=all_events.startdate then 1 else 0 end
     + case when enddate <= all_events.startdate then -1 else 0 end as in_or_out
   from @tbl 
   where startdate <= all_events.startdate
     or enddate <= all_events.startdate) as previous
) as concurent
from @tbl all_events
order by startdate

This gives the timeline of start session, with the count of concurent sessions at the moment new session starts:

idx startdate	concurent
3   2009-01-01 00:00:00.000	2
1   2009-01-01 00:00:00.000	2
2   2009-01-02 00:00:00.000	3
4   2009-01-03 00:00:00.000	3
5   2009-01-04 00:00:00.000	3
6   2009-01-05 00:00:00.000	3

To get the original request (set of concurent sessions with max concurency) you need to run this query twice, once to get the max concurent sessions and once to get the start dates of the sessions that have max concurent times, then you must get those sessions.

Updated

OK, so here the one single query that retrieves the max concurent sessions. I changed the test data to remove ambibuos overlaps of end and start:

declare @tbl table (
idx int identity(1,1) primary key,    
startdate datetime,    
enddate datetime);

insert into @tbl (startdate, enddate) 
select '2009-01-01', '2009-01-04 23:59:59'
union all select '2009-01-02', '2009-01-03 23:59:59'
union all select '2009-01-01', '2009-01-02 23:59:59'
union all select '2009-01-03', '2009-01-03 23:59:59'
union all select '2009-01-04', '2009-01-04 23:59:59'
union all select '2009-01-05', '2009-01-05 23:59:59'


select max_concurent_starts.startdate as concurentdate
  , session.*
from (
  select *
  ,(
    	select sum(in_or_out) 
    	from (
    		select case when startdate<=all_events.startdate then 1 else 0 end
    			+ case when enddate <= all_events.startdate then -1 else 0 end 
    			as in_or_out
    	  from @tbl 
    	  where startdate <= all_events.startdate
    		  or enddate <= all_events.startdate) as previous
    ) as concurent
  from @tbl all_events) as max_concurent_starts
  join @tbl as session 
     on session.startdate <= max_concurent_starts.startdate 
     and session.enddate >= max_concurent_starts.startdate
  where concurent = (
  select top 1 concurent
  from (
      select (
    	  select sum(in_or_out) 
    	  from (
    		  select case when startdate<=all_events.startdate then 1 else 0 end
    			  + case when enddate <= all_events.startdate then -1 else 0 end 
    			  as in_or_out
    	    from @tbl 
    	    where startdate <= all_events.startdate
    		    or enddate <= all_events.startdate) as previous
      ) as concurent
    from @tbl all_events) as all_events_with_concurent
    order by concurent desc)
  order by concurentdate, startdate;

This gives a result like:

concurentdate   idx	startdate	enddate
2009-01-02 00:00:00.000 3	2009-01-01 00:00:00.000	2009-01-02 23:59:59.000
2009-01-02 00:00:00.000 1	2009-01-01 00:00:00.000	2009-01-04 23:59:59.000
2009-01-02 00:00:00.000 2	2009-01-02 00:00:00.000	2009-01-03 23:59:59.000
2009-01-03 00:00:00.000 1	2009-01-01 00:00:00.000	2009-01-04 23:59:59.000
2009-01-03 00:00:00.000 2	2009-01-02 00:00:00.000	2009-01-03 23:59:59.000
2009-01-03 00:00:00.000 4	2009-01-03 00:00:00.000	2009-01-03 23:59:59.000

which reads as follows: on 2009-01-02 00:00:00 there were 3 concurent sessions (3, 1 and 2) with they respective starts and ends. There is a tie, on 2009-01-03 00:00:00 there were also 3 concurent sessions (1, 2 and 4) with their respective starts and ends.

Performance milage may vary. The query can be written 1 million times simpler in SQL 2005 using CTEs.

share|improve this answer
    
sweet: nice idea to flatten the ranges into a simple list –  van Sep 18 '09 at 22:00
    
in case you wonder why mine is so fat compared with charles's is because of the handling of ties. –  Remus Rusanu Sep 18 '09 at 22:45
    
brilliant use of sum()! thanks! –  Jen A Sep 21 '09 at 21:26

Another approach:

DECLARE @idx INT,
        @startdate DATETIME,
    @enddate DATETIME,	
        @prev_enddate DATETIME,
        @counter INT,
    @counter_max INT

DECLARE db_cursor CURSOR FOR  
SELECT idx, startdate,enddate 
FROM @tbl
ORDER BY startdate,enddate

OPEN db_cursor   

FETCH NEXT FROM db_cursor INTO @idx, @startdate, @enddate
SET @prev_enddate = @enddate
SET @counter = 0
SET @counter_max = 0

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0   
BEGIN   
IF @startdate < @prev_enddate
BEGIN
	SET @counter = @counter + 1	
	IF @counter > @counter_max
	BEGIN
		SET @counter_max = @counter
	END
END
ELSE
BEGIN
	SET @counter = 1
END

SET @prev_enddate = @enddate
FETCH NEXT FROM db_cursor INTO @idx, @startdate, @enddate   		
END   

CLOSE db_cursor   
DEALLOCATE db_cursor

SELECT @counter_max
share|improve this answer

This one is pretty short, easy to understand and works fine:

CREATE PROCEDURE FindEvents
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE dates_cursor CURSOR FOR 
    	SELECT
    		startdate AS thedate, 1 AS change
    	FROM
    		dates
    	UNION
    	SELECT
    	    enddate AS thedate, - 1 AS change
    	FROM
    		dates
    	ORDER BY 
    		thedate ASC;

    	DECLARE @max INT;
    	DECLARE @thedate DATETIME;
    	DECLARE @change INT;
    	DECLARE @current INT;

    	SET @max = 0;
    	SET @current = 0;

    OPEN dates_cursor

    FETCH NEXT FROM dates_cursor INTO @thedate, @change

    WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
    BEGIN
    	SET @current = @current + @change;
    	IF (@current > @max)
    	BEGIN
    		SET @max = @current;
    	END
        FETCH NEXT FROM dates_cursor INTO @thedate, @change
    END

    CLOSE dates_cursor
    DEALLOCATE dates_cursor

    SELECT @max;
END
share|improve this answer
    
I think that looping with a cursor is slower than having a query doing it –  MaxiWheat Sep 19 '09 at 0:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.