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Say I have records with IDs 3,4,7,9 and I want to be able to go from one to another by navitagion via next/previous links. The problem is, that I don't know how to fetch record with nearest higher ID.

So when I have record with ID 4, I need to be able to fetch next existing record, which would be 7. The query would probably look something like

SELECT * FROM foo WHERE id = 4 OFFSET 1

How can I fetch next/previous record without fetching whole result set and manualy iterating?

I'm using MySQL 5.

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3  
You shouldn't rely on ID's for sorting (that is: presuming your ID is an auto_increment column). You should create another column in the table that explicitly depicts the sort order. –  Decent Dabbler Sep 18 '09 at 21:10

10 Answers 10

up vote 61 down vote accepted

next:

select * from foo where id = (select min(id) from foo where id > 4)

previous:

select * from foo where id = (select max(id) from foo where id < 4)
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2  
I think the subqueries should be (select min(id) from foo where id > 4) and (select max(id) from foo where id < 4). –  Decent Dabbler Sep 18 '09 at 21:16
    
you're right, i forgot the FROM clause. thanks for pointing it out. :) –  longneck Sep 20 '09 at 15:33
    
This answer is usefull for me.Thanx –  Manish Jan 9 '13 at 12:55
    
thanks - worked great! –  chrishanson Feb 27 '13 at 23:04
    
This is not solution because if you remove row from "foo", what will happen? :P –  Valentin Hristov Feb 24 at 8:36

In addition to cemkalyoncu's solution:

next record:

SELECT * FROM foo WHERE id > 4 ORDER BY id LIMIT 1;

previous record:

SELECT * FROM foo WHERE id < 4 ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 1;

edit: Since this answer has been getting a few upvotes lately, I really want to stress the comment I made earlier about understanding that a primary key colum is not meant as a column to sort by, because MySQL does not guarantee that higher, auto incremented, values are necessarily added at a later time.

If you don't care about this, and simply need the record with a higher (or lower) id then this will suffice. Just don't use this as a means to determine whether a record is actually added later (or earlier). In stead, consider using a datetime column to sort by, for instance.

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All the above solutions require two database calls. The below sql code combine two sql statements into one.

select * from foo 
where ( 
        id = IFNULL((select min(id) from foo where id > 4),0) 
        or  id = IFNULL((select max(id) from foo where id < 4),0)
      )    
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2  
Definitely the best solution. Fast and all in one query. –  daemonsvk May 6 '13 at 12:37
    
Works perfeclty even in a much more complicated query! –  taiar Jul 25 at 16:42
SELECT * FROM foo WHERE id>4 ORDER BY id LIMIT 1
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+1 I think this is the cleanest solution. But the LIMIT clause should come last: SELECT * FROM foo WHERE id > 4 ORDER BY id LIMIT 1 –  Decent Dabbler Sep 18 '09 at 21:18

I was attempting to do something similar to this, but I needed the results ordered by date since I can't rely on the ID field as a sortable column. Here's the solution I came up with.

First we find out the index of the desired record in the table, when it's sorted as we want:

SELECT row
FROM 
(SELECT @rownum:=@rownum+1 row, a.* 
FROM articles a, (SELECT @rownum:=0) r
ORDER BY date, id) as article_with_rows
WHERE id = 50;

Then decrement the result by 2 put it in the limit statement. For example the above returned 21 for me so I run:

SELECT * 
FROM articles
ORDER BY date, id
LIMIT 19, 3

Gives you your primary record along with it's next and previous records given your stated order.

I tried to do it as a single database call, but couldn't get the LIMIT statement to take a variable as one of it's parameters.

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I am interested in your approach. What if you need to do a JOIN also? Say, FROM articles a JOIN authors b ON b.this = a.that. It appears to me that the JOIN messes up the ordering. Here's an example pastebin.com/s7R62GYV –  idrarig Sep 2 '13 at 14:20

I had the same problem as Dan, so I used his answer and improved it.

First select the row index, nothing different here.

SELECT row
FROM 
(SELECT @rownum:=@rownum+1 row, a.* 
FROM articles a, (SELECT @rownum:=0) r
ORDER BY date, id) as article_with_rows
WHERE id = 50;

Now use two separate queries. For example if the row index is 21, the query to select the next record will be:

SELECT * 
FROM articles
ORDER BY date, id
LIMIT 21, 1

To select the previous record use this query:

SELECT * 
FROM articles
ORDER BY date, id
LIMIT 19, 1

Keep in mind that for the first row (row index is 1), the limit will go to -1 and you will get a MySQL error. You can use an if-statement to prevent this. Just don't select anything, since there is no previous record anyway. In the case of the last record, there will be next row and therefor there will be no result.

Also keep in mind that if you use DESC for ordering, instead of ASC, you queries to select the next and previous rows are still the same, but switched.

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Next row

SELECT * FROM `foo` LIMIT number++ , 1

Previous row

SELECT * FROM `foo` LIMIT number-- , 1

sample next row

SELECT * FROM `foo` LIMIT 1 , 1
SELECT * FROM `foo` LIMIT 2 , 1
SELECT * FROM `foo` LIMIT 3 , 1

sample previous row

SELECT * FROM `foo` LIMIT -1 , 1
SELECT * FROM `foo` LIMIT -2 , 1
SELECT * FROM `foo` LIMIT -3 , 1

SELECT * FROM `foo` LIMIT 3 , 1
SELECT * FROM `foo` LIMIT 2 , 1
SELECT * FROM `foo` LIMIT 1 , 1
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Select top 1 * from foo where id > 4 order by id asc

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1  
mysql doesn't support TOP –  longneck Sep 18 '09 at 21:04
1  
Top 1 * doesn't work in mysql. –  Byron Whitlock Sep 18 '09 at 21:05
1  
my ignorance sorry –  Gratzy Sep 18 '09 at 21:06
1  
Equivalent MySQL is "LIMIT 1": select * from foo where id>4 order by id asc LIMIT 1 –  mob Sep 18 '09 at 21:15

Maybe it is wrong guess but maybe what you need you might get using CURSOR

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/cursors.html

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cursors will be overkill for this task. –  Cem Kalyoncu Sep 18 '09 at 21:08

You should handle that with and iterator object in your application.

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