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I'm just trying to use a keyword to search either recent tweets or users' bios for relevant users. I'm confused about the OAuth part though. It seems like OAuth and twitter applications are for letting someone log into your site using twitter, and give you permission to do twitter stuff on their behalf.

I don't want other people to log in, I just want to search twitter for myself. Do I have to set up an application, then use OAuth to log in as myself everytime before I make a search request? I feel like I'm doing something wrong!?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No need for an application if you want to search Twitter. Just use the Search API:

http://search.twitter.com/search.json?q=stackoverflow

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Awesome. Too bad it doesn't come back with a little more information about the user who tweated it. Is there anyway I can use the from_user_id or from_user to get more information about that user, like their bio for example? –  Stephen Sarcsam Kamenar Jan 22 '13 at 22:11
2  
Right now search api doesn't provide detailed user information, but you can retrieve user information if you start using streaming api. Unfortunately for streaming api you need to write a process which has to run continously to capture real-time tweets and can't be run backward in time. Nice thing about is that the tweets captured from streaming api are much more detailed i.e gives information about user, retweeted-tweet, replied user, embedded entities such as mentioned urls, hashtags, users etc.. dev.twitter.com/docs/streaming-apis –  cubbuk Jan 22 '13 at 22:44
    
The Twitter search API will require an application and OAuth on March 5th with Twitter API 1.1. The example shown above will stop working on that date. –  Adam Green Feb 3 '13 at 14:27

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