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To keep it simple lets say I have 3 whole numbers (integers) I know I can find the highest by using something like:

if(num1 > num2 && num1 > num3)
    cout << num1 << endl;
if(num2 > num1 && num2 > num3)
    cout << num2 << endl;
if(num3 > num1 && num3 > num2)
    cout << num3 << endl; 

And the lowest:

if(num1 < num2 && num1 < num3)
    cout << num1 << endl;
if(num2 > num1 && num2 > num3)
    cout << num2 << endl;
if(num3 < num1 && num3 < num2)
    cout << num3 << endl;

How can I get something like this to deal with equalities like 221,111,122,121. edit: Im trying to stay away from any prebuilt math includes as that is not the point here..

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3  
Let me just give you advice that you should rather use else if statement after first if instead of if all the time. –  Piotr Chojnacki Jan 22 '13 at 21:44
    
Why wouldn't it work with 221, 111, 122 and 121? Also, I think you have the operators in the second if of the second code sample the wrong way around. –  Joseph Mansfield Jan 22 '13 at 21:45
    
as long as you're always dealing with just three numbers, how about replacing < with <= ? –  Andy Prowl Jan 22 '13 at 21:46
    
Are you looking for >= greater than or equal to? (Is that what you mean by equalities like 221,111,122,121, that is, num1 = 2; num2 = 2; num3 = 1?) –  iamnotmaynard Jan 22 '13 at 21:47
1  
Make your own math libaries then and use them. Start with std::max. Then max(max(num1, num2), num3)) is your max. Should take a minute. –  GManNickG Jan 22 '13 at 21:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should look into storing your values in a container such as vector (I can't tell if you will always have three or if you may vary in number). Then you can use std::min_element and std::max_element which are already written and tuned to find the min/max from a sequence of values.

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Thats a great idea –  user2001875 Jan 22 '13 at 21:53
6  
Another fun trick, in c++11: std::max and std::min both have overloads that use initializer lists. This lets you do int m = std::max({a,b,c,d}). In the cases where you have a fixed set of variables to compare, and don't have another use for a container. –  Dave S Jan 22 '13 at 22:19
6  
Further, C++11 has std::minmax and std::minmax_element to give you both items with a single traversal. –  ildjarn Jan 22 '13 at 22:46

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