Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a SQL table similar to this:

+-----------------------------------------------+
|   ID   | FirstName | LastName  | SomeOtherData|
+-----------------------------------------------+
|  200   | Robert    | Barone    | Foo          |
|  228   | Doug      | Heffernan | Bar          |
|  2091  | Robert    | Barone    | Foo          |
|  3921  | Doug      | Heffernan | Bar          |
|  291   | Greg      | Warner    | Barfoo       |
+-----------------------------------------------+

Now what I'm having trouble producing is a table that'll list both IDs for a given Person, assuming that FirstName and LastName are used to indicate duplicates. So, basically I'm trying to get:

+---------------------------------------------------------+
|   ID   | OtherID | FirstName | LastName  | SomeOtherData|
+---------------------------------------------------------+
|  200   | 2091    | Robert    | Barone    | Foo          |
|  228   | 3921    | Doug      | Heffernan | Bar          |
|  291   |         | Greg      | Warner    | Barfoo       |
+---------------------------------------------------------+

Would anyone be able to help me out with something like this? Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Sounds to me like there's no unique indexes on First/Last, which means that potentially there can be more than 2 Ids for a person. Are you sure you can only have 2 IDs? –  EBarr Jan 22 '13 at 21:44
    
How many other id's? Is that a "max 2 id's" or can there be plenty? –  TomTom Jan 22 '13 at 21:44
    
I know for sure there are at max 2 IDs, at least in my current situation. I verified with a query to count the duplicated instances for any given FirstName, LastName combo. –  JToland Jan 22 '13 at 21:45
    
If it is only 2 it is trivial though possibly slow - make a query for first (possibly lowest or max id), then a subselect to get the other id or the OtherId field. Multiple is a lot harder. –  TomTom Jan 22 '13 at 21:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use a PIVOT which will transform the data from rows into columns:

select [1] Id,
  [2] OtherId,
  firstname, 
  lastname
from
(
  select id, firstname, lastname,
    row_number() over(partition by firstname, lastname
                      order by id) rn
  from yourtable
) src
pivot
(
  max(id)
  for rn in ([1], [2])
) piv

See SQL Fiddle with Demo

Or you could use an aggregate function with a CASE expression:

select 
  max(case when rn = 1 then id end) Id,
  max(case when rn = 2 then id end) OtherId,
  firstname,
  lastname
from
(
  select id, firstname, lastname,
    row_number() over(partition by firstname, lastname
                      order by id) rn
  from yourtable
) src
group by firstname, lastname

The above will work great if you have a known number of duplicate values (1, 2, etc). You could also implement dynamic SQL if you have more than 2 id's. The dynamic SQL would look like:

DECLARE @cols AS NVARCHAR(MAX),
    @colNames AS NVARCHAR(MAX),
    @query  AS NVARCHAR(MAX)

select @cols = STUFF((SELECT distinct ',' + QUOTENAME(cast(row_number() over(partition by firstname, lastname order by id) as varchar(50))) 
                    from yourtable
            FOR XML PATH(''), TYPE
            ).value('.', 'NVARCHAR(MAX)') 
        ,1,1,'')


select @colNames = STUFF((SELECT distinct ', ' + QUOTENAME(cast(row_number() over(partition by firstname, lastname order by id) as varchar(50))) +' as Id_' + cast(row_number() over(partition by firstname, lastname order by id) as varchar(50)) 
                    from yourtable
            FOR XML PATH(''), TYPE
            ).value('.', 'NVARCHAR(MAX)') 
        ,1,1,'')

set @query = 'SELECT ' + @colNames + ', firstname, lastname from 
             (
                select id, firstname, lastname,
                  row_number() over(partition by firstname, lastname
                                    order by id) rn
                from yourtable
            ) x
            pivot 
            (
                max(id)
                for rn in (' + @cols + ')
            ) p 
            '

execute(@query)

See SQL Fiddle with Demo

The result of all 3 would be:

|  ID | OTHERID | FIRSTNAME |  LASTNAME |
-----------------------------------------
| 200 |    2091 |    Robert |    Barone |
| 228 |    3921 |      Doug | Heffernan |
| 291 |  (null) |      Greg |    Warner |
share|improve this answer
    
Wow - impressive query. I've never heard of using a PIVOT before. –  JToland Jan 22 '13 at 21:47
    
The good thing here is that this also works with more than 2 doubles ;) One of the rarely used sql commands that many people do not know. Still very useful. Anyone who did not do OLAP will rarely know that. –  TomTom Jan 22 '13 at 21:47
    
@JToland pivoting data comes in very handy in these situations. –  bluefeet Jan 22 '13 at 21:58
    
@bluefeet If I wanted to get ALL columns from the yourtable, rather than just the FirstName, LastName, and IDs, how would I need to modify the queries? I keep getting compile/syntax errors when I'm trying to add those in...Thanks again! –  JToland Jan 22 '13 at 22:19
    
@JToland If you are using the PIVOT, then you would have to add them to the subquery first, then add the column to the other query. If you are using the CASE then you will have to add it to the GROUP BY. However, if you want to add more fields, it could throw off the result of the query so you will have to modify the query slightly. See this demo -- sqlfiddle.com/#!3/c7ec6/13 –  bluefeet Jan 22 '13 at 22:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.