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After it has been confirmed that the user is logged in, how should pages only members are allowed to see be shown?

For example

<?php
    start_session();
    if(isset($_SESSION[userLoggedIn]))
        echo 'welcome to the members area!';
    else
        echo 'You must log in first';
?>

OR

<?php
    start_session();
    if(!isset($_SESSION[userLoggedIn]))
        goto notLoggedIn;
?>
    welcome to the members area!
<?php
    notLoggedIn:
        echo 'You must log in first';
?>

OR

<?php
    start_session();
    if(isset($_SESSION[userLoggedIn]))
        include members.html;
    else
        include public.html
?>

I don't like having too much HTML inside PHP.

When using the include/require solution, how do I make it so people can't just go access the html file directily? For example include members.html; what's stopping a user to type in the url ~/members.html? ATM I'm using WAMP but I'm guessing there's a setting on the server?

EDIT: Ok this is what my plan is: create two directories public and private and make the webroot public. I'm going to have 1 page that checks to see if the user is logged in and if so the value from $_GET['destination'] will be used to include the correct page from the private directory. Any pitfalls I haven't thought of?

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3  
if you are at a point where you are handling complex interaction such as authentication and its myriad of security/functionality pitfalls AND you are starting to see the benefits of separating your business and presentation logic, perhaps its time for you to start evaluating a good PHP framework? phpframeworks.com –  Francis Yaconiello Jan 22 '13 at 21:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't like having too much HTML inside PHP.

Good. Then move your HTML into HTML templates that handle the presentation logic:

 start_session();
 if(isset($_SESSION['userLoggedIn'])){
    require 'public_html/logged_in.php';

 }else{
    require 'public_html/public_area.php';
 }

Better yet, create a function that loads these templates, like:

function load_template($file, array $vars){
  extract($vars);
  unset($file, $vars);
  require func_get_arg(0);
}

When using the include/require solution, how do I make it so people can't just go access the html file directily?

A few ways:

  • define a constant in the main script; check if this constant is defined in your template, exit if not
  • or pass a variable to your template that does the same thing
  • or put these templates outside the web root
  • or protect them with .htaccess rules

I'm assuming here these templates are also PHP scripts. But of course you can also use some kind of templating system on top of PHP, or create your own...

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I would advise against goto, it's really not necessary in this situation. Using includes is a nice way to go if you have multiple pages and don't want to mix HTML and PHP.

If you want everything to be contained on a single page, you can set a variable:

<?php
    start_session();
    $logged_in = ($_SESSION['isLoggedIn'] == true);
    // Whatever else you need...
?>

Then, later on the page (probably at the end), using the alternative syntax, you can do:

<?php if( $logged_in): ?>
    <p>Welcome to the member's area!</p>
<?php else: ?>
    <p>You must log in first!</p>
<?php endif; ?>
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Keep your PHP files clean by redirecting the visitor away if he/she isn't logged in:

if (empty($_SESSION['user_id'])
{
    header('Location: /not_logged_in_page'); // Redirect to another page!
    exit;
}

// Continue with the loggedin user page...
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