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I have a class and I would like to include an "Empty" constant member similar to Point.Empty in System.Drawing. Is that possible?

Here's a simplified version of what is giving an error:

public class TrivialClass
{
    public const TrivialClass Empty = new TrivialClass(0);
    public int MyValue;
    public TrivialClass(int InitialValue)
    {
        MyValue = InitialValue;
    }
}

The error given is: TrivialClass.Empty is of type TrivialClass. A const field of a reference type other than string can only be initialized with null.

If it matters, I'd like to use it like this:

void SomeFunction()
{
    TrivialClass myTrivial = TrivialClass.Empty;
    // Do stuff ...
}
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3  
yes I know this is .NET and there is no Main Think again.... –  I4V Jan 22 '13 at 21:51
    
@I4V thank you for the insight. Interesting and I'll look into that later but I fail to see how that helps with the question. –  AppFzx Jan 22 '13 at 21:52
    
@AppFzx: He's just saying that .NET does use a static Main method as the default entry point. –  mellamokb Jan 22 '13 at 21:53
    
@mellamokb Thanks. I changed it since it was a confusing name. –  AppFzx Jan 22 '13 at 21:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can use static readonly for these types. Constants can only be initialised with literal values (e.g. numbers, strings).

public class TrivialClass
{
    public static readonly TrivialClass Empty = new TrivialClass(0);
    public int MyValue;
    public TrivialClass(int InitialValue)
    {
        MyValue = InitialValue;
    }
}

After looking up the definition. Point.Empty is also static readonly. Reference here.

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Perfect, this worked! Thank you –  AppFzx Jan 22 '13 at 21:57
1  
Whether or not const can be used has nothing to do with whether it's a reference type or a value type. You can only assign a compile time constant to such an identifier. For any reference value that is a compile time literal (i.e. null or any string literals) those can work. For value types, they still need to be compile time literals (meaning pretty much just numeric types). default(...) is not a compile time literal. –  Servy Jan 22 '13 at 22:03
    
@servy or string, char. –  flem Jan 22 '13 at 22:08
    
@flem I already mentioned string as a reference type, and char is a value type, not a reference type, but yes, there are compile time literals for characters. –  Servy Jan 22 '13 at 22:09
    
Oh, and Point is not a reference type, it's a value type. –  Servy Jan 22 '13 at 22:18

Just a quick shoot, but I would suggest that Point.Empty is a static member, not a constant:

public class TrivialClass
{
    public static readonly TrivialClass Empty = new TrivialClass(0);
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
You're right, Point.Empty is static. It's also readonly. See my answer. –  flem Jan 22 '13 at 21:55

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