Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Below the code from here Fun with Type Functions

{-# LANGUAGE MultiParamTypeClasses, FlexibleInstances, FlexibleContexts, TypeFamilies #-}

-- Start basic
class Add a b where
  type SumTy a b
  add :: a -> b -> SumTy a b

instance Add Integer Double where
  type SumTy Integer Double = Double
  add x y = fromIntegral x + y

instance Add Double Integer where
  type SumTy Double Integer = Double
  add x y = x + fromIntegral y

instance (Num a) => Add a a where
  type SumTy a a = a
  add x y = x + y
-- End basic

This is the code which I'm trying to run:

main = print $ show (add 1 1)

This is the result:

No instance for (Show (SumTy a0 b0))
      arising from a use of `show'
    Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (Show (SumTy a0 b0))
    In the second argument of `($)', namely `show (add 1 1)'
    In the expression: print $ show (add 1 1)
    In an equation for `main': main = print $ show (add 1 1)

I've tried few things like putting "data" everywhere:

Result 1

Not a data constructor: `a'

Result 2 (after removing "instance (Num a)")

Multiple declarations of `Double'
Declared at: ...

like adding some function:

class Add a b where
    type SumTy a b
    add :: a -> b -> SumTy a b
    s :: SumTy a b -> String

instance Add Integer Double where
    type SumTy Integer Double = Double
    add x y = fromIntegral x + y
    s (SumTy _ x) = show x

main = print $ show (s (add 1 2.0) )

with this result:

Not in scope: data constructor `SumTy'

As you may have noticed I'm stuck so any help is priceless for me. :)

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is that there is not enough context to determine which instance of Add to use, and hence the type of the result cannot be determined. Since ghc doesn't know which types to use, it reports the most generic problem, there's no Show instance for a generic SumTy a b:

No instance for (Show (SumTy a0 b0))
      arising from a use of `show'
    Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (Show (SumTy a0 b0))
    In the second argument of `($)', namely `show (add 1 1)'
    In the expression: print $ show (add 1 1)
    In an equation for `main': main = print $ show (add 1 1)

The suggested "Possible fix" isn't what is required here, though. What you need is to specify the types of the arguments to add, so that the instance to use can be determined, and thus the result type:

*TyFun> show (add (1 :: Int) (1 :: Int))
"2"
*TyFun> show (add (1 :: Integer) (1 :: Integer))
"2"
*TyFun> show (add (1 :: Integer) (1 :: Double))
"2.0"
*TyFun> show (add (1 :: Integer) (1 :: Float))

<interactive>:7:1:
    No instance for (Show (SumTy Integer Float))
      arising from a use of `show'
    Possible fix:
      add an instance declaration for (Show (SumTy Integer Float))
    In the expression: show (add (1 :: Integer) (1 :: Float))
    In an equation for `it':
        it = show (add (1 :: Integer) (1 :: Float))

<interactive>:7:7:
    No instance for (Add Integer Float) arising from a use of `add'
    Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (Add Integer Float)
    In the first argument of `show', namely
      `(add (1 :: Integer) (1 :: Float))'
    In the expression: show (add (1 :: Integer) (1 :: Float))
    In an equation for `it':
        it = show (add (1 :: Integer) (1 :: Float))
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent answer. Thank you very much. Maybe you could help me with writing this "s" function (from my code above) also? I do not understand how to write signature of "s". Is it possible at all? –  panurg Jan 23 '13 at 21:27
    
@panurg, in your instance declaration you are pattern matching against SumTy, which is not correct: SumTy is only type alias, not data constructor (that's what the compiler is saying to you). You defined SumTy in your instance to be equal to Double, so everywhere in that instance usage of type SumTy Integer Double is equivalent to plain Double. Just substitute your (SumTy _ x) with just x and it will work. –  Vladimir Matveev Jan 24 '13 at 6:17
    
@VladimirMatveev I don't know how to use "s" which you described in your post. I was trying: s (2.0::Double) and I got this: Couldn't match type SumTy a0 b0' with Double' In the first argument of s', namely (2.0 :: Double)' Could you explain me how should I use it? –  panurg Jan 24 '13 at 19:09
    
@panurg, I guess you're right. I was sure this would work, but I tried to run it and got precisely yours error. I don't know why is this happening, maybe someone more knowing will answer. –  Vladimir Matveev Jan 24 '13 at 20:16
1  
@panurg I thought you tried to add s just as a crutch since you had problems calling add and printing the result. With an associated type synonym type SumTy a b, you can't use it, since there is no way to determine the types a and b from SumTy a b, different pairs of types could map to the same SumTy (they already do, Integer and Double in both orders map to Double), so the compiler can't know which instance to use. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 24 '13 at 23:33
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.