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CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `domains` (
`domains_id` bigint(15) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`domains_url` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`domains_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=1 ;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `domains_actions` (
  `domains_actions_id` int(15) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `domains_actions_selmgec` int(15) NOT NULL,
  `domains_id` int(15) NOT NULL,
  `domains_actions_member` int(15) NOT NULL,
  `domains_actions_date` date NOT NULL,
  `actions_id` int(2) NOT NULL
  `domains_actions_value` int(15) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`domains_actions_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=1 ;


CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `actions` (
  `actions_id` int(15) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `actions_action` varchar(15) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`actions_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=1 ;

So if I have read properly, I need an actions tables for the likes/new/social then this is linked into domains_actions.

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How often do you join to one of these tables? Are you hitting a performance ceiling? –  Jason Sperske Jan 22 '13 at 22:18

2 Answers 2

Not sure what you're trying to do with these, but they obviously have repeating data. You should consolidate into one table with a type column; perhaps using ENUM.

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `domains` (
  `domains_id` int(15) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `domains_selmgec` int(15) NOT NULL,
  `domains_domain` int(15) NOT NULL,
  `domains_member` int(15) NOT NULL,
  `domains_date` date NOT NULL,
  `domains_type` int(2) NOT NULL,
  `type` ENUM('likes', 'new', 'social'),
  PRIMARY KEY (`domains_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=3 ;

A more relational and normalized schema would look something like:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `domain` (
  `id` int(15) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `selmgec` int(15) NOT NULL,
  `domain` int(15) NOT NULL,
  `member` int(15) NOT NULL,
  `date` date NOT NULL,
  `type` int(2) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `type` (
  `id` tinyint(1) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `type` varchar(6) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `domainType` (
  `domain_id` int(15) NOT NULL,
  `type_id` tinyint(1) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`domain_id`, `type_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

This design will allow you hold a single domain and assign it multiple types. You would need to change the engine to InnoDb and create foreign key constrains to enforce these types.

See the demo

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I tend to prefer fewer cleaner tables that associate with a single idea or object type (a Domain in this example, as opposed to a LikedDomain). –  Jason Sperske Jan 22 '13 at 22:20
    
@RichardBrown Depends on how large your table should be. With proper indexes it shouldn't be an issue. –  Kermit Jan 22 '13 at 22:20
    
ok but say like each table had 1,000,000 results in? would this not be faster than the one table with 3,000,000 in? –  Richard Brown Jan 22 '13 at 22:21
    
@RichardBrown It would be negligible. –  Kermit Jan 22 '13 at 22:22
    
ok so the single table is the way to go! –  Richard Brown Jan 22 '13 at 22:28

Without knowing all of the details, I would create one table and then a TypeId column that references another table:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `domains` (
  `domains_id` int(15) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `domains_selmgec` int(15) NOT NULL,
  `domains_domain` int(15) NOT NULL,
  `domains_member` int(15) NOT NULL,
  `domains_date` date NOT NULL,
  `domains_type` int(2) NOT NULL,
  `type_id` int(2) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`domains_likes_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=3 ;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `types` (
  `type_id` int(15) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `type_name` varchar(15) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`type_id`)
) ;
share|improve this answer
    
+1; perhaps even a mapping table for domainType? –  Kermit Jan 22 '13 at 22:21
1  
@njk agreed, there are many ways to model this. And they are all probably better than using 3 identical tables. :) –  bluefeet Jan 22 '13 at 22:23
    
whats a mapping table? –  Richard Brown Jan 22 '13 at 22:25
    
@RichardBrown See the update in my answer. –  Kermit Jan 22 '13 at 22:31

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