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This is a simple bit of code from python documentation on how to generate a random sequence ie choose a colour when each of them has a weight associated.

I understand the concept but cant figure out what the list comprehension is doing when i tried to do it myself. Could someone explain iteratively what this list comprehension is doing so i can understand this piece of code better. thanks.

weighted_choices = [('Red', 3), ('Blue', 2), ('Yellow', 1), ('Green', 4)]
population = [val for val, cnt in weighted_choices for i in range(cnt)]
random.choice(population)
'Green'
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Rule of thumb for nested list comprehensions: expand the for loops in the same order they appear in the comprehensnion. –  wim Jan 22 '13 at 22:41
4  
As a note, I would argue this isn't a great way to do a weighted random choice. –  Lattyware Jan 22 '13 at 22:42
    
@Lattyware agreed/ –  Niklas R Jan 22 '13 at 22:56

4 Answers 4

weighted_choices = [('Red', 3), ('Blue', 2), ('Yellow', 1), ('Green', 4)]
population = [val for val, cnt in weighted_choices for i in range(cnt)]
random.choice(population)
'Green'

Lets make the comprehension simple to start with

simple = [val for val, cnt in weighted_choices]

This simple list comprehension is doing this:

  • For every item in weighted_choices break the first part and assign it to val and the second part to cnt.
  • Take the val and create a new array out of each val

This would produce:

['Red','Blue','Yellow''Green']

Now lets look the second part lets make a simple list comprehension first

second_part = ['Red' for i in range(3)]

This second part of the list comprehension is doing this:

  • For every i in range(3) (the numbers [0,1,2])
  • Discard i and add 'Red' to the list

This would produce:

['Red','Red','Red']

Combining both comprehensions:

population = [val for val, cnt in weighted_choices for i in range(cnt)]

This simple list comprehension is doing this:

  • For every item in weighted_choices break the first part and assign it to val and the second part to cnt. (e.g 'Red' and 3 for the first item)
  • Take the val and
  • For every i in range(cnt) (the numbers [0,1,2] if cnt is 3) discard i and add val to the list

This would produce:

['Red', 'Red', 'Red', 'Blue', 'Blue', 'Yellow', 'Green', 'Green', 'Green', 'Green']
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Think of it like a for loop that looks like this:

population = []
for val, cnt in weighted_choices:
  for i in range(cnt):
    population.append(val)

Starting with weighted_choices, it iterates through each item, giving you something like:

('Red', 3)

From there, it iterates through a range of length cnt (3, here) and appends val (Red) to population that many times. So at the end you get:

['Red',
 'Red',
 'Red',
 'Blue',
 'Blue',
 'Yellow',
 'Green',
 'Green',
 'Green',
 'Green']

Which as you can see contains Red three times, Blue twice, Yellow once and Green four times, which reflects the number next to each color in the initial list.

When I look at list comprehensions that are doubly nested like that, I just think of a for loop like the one above and then 'squash' it down in my head so that it is all on one line. Not the most advanced way but it helps me keep it straight :)

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It's best to expand the list comprehension to analyze it:

population = []
for val, cnt in weighted_choices:
    for i in range(cnt):
        population.append(val)

This expands weighted_choices into a list of elements where each item is repeated according to their weight; Red is added 3 times, Blue 2 times, etc:

['Red', 'Red', 'Red', 'Blue', 'Blue', 'Yellow', 'Green', 'Green', 'Green', 'Green']

The random.choice() function then takes one of those elements at random, but Green occurs 4 times and thus has a higher chance of being picked than, say, Yellow, which is present only once in that expanded list.

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append(i) should be append(val) –  Niklas R Jan 22 '13 at 22:57
    
@NiklasR: indeed, corrected, thanks. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 22 '13 at 23:09

The list comprehension consists of 2 for loops.

Try it with print instead

for val, cnt in weighted_choices:
  # the first for loop will be executed len(weighted_choices) times = 4
  for i in range(cnt):
  # the second for loop will be executed cnt times
  # for each execution of the outer loop 
  # (cnt = second element of each tuple)
      print val # it will print each first element of the tuple 'Red', ...
                # len(weighted_choices) * cnt times

Now instead of print your code adds the val to a list called population. The rest is trivial, the code makes a random choice using the list as input.

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