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I have a problem with sscanf() in the following code:

void num_check(const char*ps){
char *ps1=NULL;
int number=0;
unsigned sum_num=0;
ps1=ps;

for(;*ps1!='\0';ps1++){
    if (isdigit(*ps1)){
      sscanf(ps1,"%d",&number);
      sum_num+=number;
    }
    }
printf("Sum of digits is: %d",sum_num);


}


int main(){

printf("Enter a string:\n");
char str[20];
gets(str);
num_check(str);
return 0;
}

The problem is: when I input a string in the form of "w2b4e" it sums my numbers OK, and I get the desired result. But when I try to input a string such as "w23b4e", what it does is: it sees the number 23 in the loop, so variable number=23, and sum_num=23, but the next step in the loop is this: number=3, and sum_num=26. And in the next step sum_num= 30... This confuses me quite a bit. Since I don't believe that sscanf() has such a quirky flaw, what am I doing wrong?

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1  
What result do you expect from w23b4e? 27 or 9? –  rburny Jan 22 '13 at 22:57
    
by the way, It is enough to use *ps1! and omitting !='\0' since '\0' expresses 0 –  woryzower Jan 22 '13 at 23:02
    
@woryzower thx, I use it probably because I still haven't mastered C as well as I would like... :D –  Nebbs Jan 22 '13 at 23:22
    
@woryzower: Some code conventions (notably, Google's internal one) recommend always comparing variable with same type constant instead of bool casting. Similarly, you'd comapre pointer to NULL, etc. –  rburny Jan 22 '13 at 23:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want to sum digits (not the whole number), use the following instead:

if( isdigit(*ps1)) {
  sum_num += *ps1 - '0';
}

You can also use sscanf("%1d", ps1) to make it read only one character.

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@R Burny thx, that was it. I entered "%1d", and that was it. Btw, why *ps1 - '0'? What does that do? –  Nebbs Jan 22 '13 at 23:01
    
ASCII characters are represented in memory as consecutive integers (although '0' digit is mapped to integer 48, not 0). So '0' = 48, '1' = 49, ..., '9' = 57. Hence *ps1 - '0' calculates what digit you have. For example, '7' - '0' = 55 - 48 = 7. Writing '0' lets you not rely on magical constant 48. –  rburny Jan 22 '13 at 23:05
    
@R Burny Once again thx. :) –  Nebbs Jan 22 '13 at 23:09

You always advance by exactly one character in the loop: ps1++. You probably want to advance ps1 to the first digit instead.

Better yet, there's a function called strtol. It tries to parse integers from strings and can return the position of the first character that could not be read. So you can use strtol in a loop to sum everything that looks like a number in your string.


If you want to sum digits instead of numbers found in a string, it's easier:

while (*p) {
    if (isdigit(*p))
        sum_num += *p - '0';
}
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@cnicutarno, it's ok to advance only one character, the problem is that if I have one digit after another it pairs them as a number eg. "23", and in the next step it sees the second part of the number eg. "3". –  Nebbs Jan 22 '13 at 22:56
for(;*ps1!='\0';ps1++){
if (isdigit(*ps1)){
  sscanf(ps1,"%d",&number);
  sum_num+=number;
}
}

you are incrementing ps1 one character at a time, independently of how many digits are being read. Unfortunately you cannot use sscanf for this task, since you are not able to know how many characters have been read.

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sscanf works like it should, it doesn't move beginning of pointer, you are moving it by one character in for loop.

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