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I'm trying to add an alert to my log for a running insert of a view into a table when there is an error executing the query in the view. When I run the view alone, I get an invalid input into SUBSTRING (the exact wording of the error I can't remember). When I run it as part of my view -> table stored procedure, the error is ignored, then I have to go digging for the offending line and make an exception in the view's code to omit that line from the results (I know, it sounds kludge-y, but I'm doing data reduction on huge web-log files from a specialized webapp), but I digress.

I've tried two different methods for trying to catch the error and neither are triggered in such a way to insert the row indicating an error in my execution result table (refresh_results). I think I may be missing some fundamental - perhaps the errors are being encapsulated in come way. If I can't detect the error, the only way to notice an error is if someone notices the number of entries into the table is low for a given period of time.

    SELECT @TransactionName = 'tname';
    BEGIN TRANSACTION @TransactionName;
    BEGIN TRY
      print 'tname ***In Try***';
      if exists (select name from sysobjects where name='tablename')
      begin
        drop table tablename;
      end
      select * into tablename 
      from opendatasource('SQLNCLI', 'Data Source=DATABASE;UID=####;password=####').dbo.viewname;
      COMMIT TRANSACTION @TransactionName;
    END TRY
    BEGIN CATCH 
      print 'tablename ***ERROR - check for SUBSTRING***';
      begin transaction
      set   @result_table = 'tablename ***ERROR - check for SUBSTRING***'
      select    @result_time = getdate(),
            @result_rows = count(logtime)
      from tablename
      insert INTO   [dbo].[refresh_results] (result_time, result_table, result_rows)
                values (@result_time, @result_table, @result_rows);
      commit transaction
      ROLLBACK TRANSACTION @TransactionName;
    END CATCH 

or

    if exists (select name from sysobjects where name='tablename')
    begin
      drop table tablename;
    end
    select * into tablename 
    from opendatasource('SQLNCLI', 'Data Source=DATABASE;UID=####;password=####').dbo.viewname;

    print '@@error' 
print @@error

if @@error <> 0 
Begin
      print 'tablename ***ERROR - check for SUBSTRING***';
      set     @result_table = 'tablename ***ERROR - check for SUBSTRING***'
      select  @result_time = getdate(),
          @result_rows = count(logtime)
      from tablename
      insert INTO   [dbo].[refresh_results] (result_time, result_table, result_rows)
                values (@result_time, @result_table, @result_rows);
    End
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2  
fyi: It is customary to redact usernames and passwords when posting samples. –  HABO Jan 22 '13 at 23:19
    
yikes, I redacted everything but that... :) –  MattInSD73 Jan 22 '13 at 23:41

3 Answers 3

Your nested transactions aren't doing what you think. You are rolling back the error you thought you stored. Roll back the initial transaction and then, if you feel the need, start a new transaction for logging the error.

See here.

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You have two seperate problems

In your first example you are running transactions that do the following:

BEGIN TRAN
    ...error...
    BEGIN TRAN
        ...log error...
    COMMIT TRAN
ROLLBACK TRAN

The inner transaction is rolled back with the outer transaction. Maybe try:

BEGIN TRAN
    ...error...
ROLLBACK TRAN
BEGIN TRAN
    ...log error...
ROLLBACK TRAN

The second example you are using @@ERROR. As I understand it as soon as you run something @@ERROR is replaced. That something I think includes the print statement.

If you change it to something like:

DECLARE @Error INT
select * into tablename 
from opendatasource('SQLNCLI', 'Data Source=DATA3;UID=;password=').dbo.viewname;

SET @Error = @@ERROR
print '@@error' 
print @Error

if @Error <> 0
...log the error

The advantage of the TRY CATCH is that if you have an error it will catch it. The @@ERROR method works 100% but it only works on the last line run. so if you have an error with DROP TABLE tablename @@ERROR won't get it (unless you add another check)

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I tried your last suggestion, setting @error to @@error before checking and it's a no-go to catch the error and lead into the error code. –  MattInSD73 Jan 23 '13 at 20:27
    
What happens when you try it? –  Greg Jan 23 '13 at 20:27
    
It returns a value of 0 in the Results tab and 1 row(s) affected in the Messages tab. I even too out the set, print,print and the same thing happened. –  MattInSD73 Jan 23 '13 at 23:41
    
I'm not sure what's selecting 0 in the result set or why you're not getting your print statement. If you take out the SET @Error = @@ERROR statement then you're not going to get a value in @Error for the IF statement –  Greg Jan 24 '13 at 0:01
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok, so I had to use a helper procedure to add a log entry. I think what was going on is that the rollback was also rolling back the log entry.

This is what I had to do:

    DECLARE @myError tinyint;
    BEGIN TRY
        BEGIN TRANSACTION;      
        if exists (select name from sys.sysobjects where name='table_name')
        begin
          drop table table_name
        end
        select * into table_name
          from opendatasource('SQLNCLI', 'Data Source=###;UID=###;password=###').view_Table
        COMMIT TRANSACTION;
    END TRY
    BEGIN CATCH 
        set @myError = 1                
        ROLLBACK TRANSACTION;
    END CATCH

    if @myError <> 0
    begin
        exec dbo.table error
    end
    ELSE
        EXEC  exec dbo.table normal row
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