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Let's say I want to use Breeze to create a Task entity (I'm using EF), but because this is a real task application, the task must be associated to the currently logged in user. Tasks have UserId foreign keys that need to be populated during save and that's where I'm stuck. Doing this in a mostly client-side application is a foreign concept to me. I can't very well specify the UserId foreign key on the client side because I don't want a clever user might create tasks for another user. Where do I go about hooking into the save process to populate the UserId FK with the currently logged in user (System.Web.HttpContext.Current.User.Identity.Name in this case).

Feel free to point me in the direction of another post or documentation. As I said, this is a new concept to me so I don't really know what to search for.

And to whoever answer this question, I love you with all my heart. :)

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What kind of authentication are you using for your site? The answer will probably depend on that information. –  Bryant Jan 22 '13 at 23:54
    
Forms auth. In another non-Breeze MVC 4 project, I can easily access System.Web.HttpContext.Current.User in a WebAPI controller action to perform programmatic security checks, so I'm hoping I can do something similar with a Breeze controller. Filtering data in a query is easy to do. Handling the creation of new records where certain properties need to be populated on the server is where I'm stuck (I don't know how to do this in a pure WebAPI controller either). –  Alex Dresko Jan 23 '13 at 0:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Take a look at the documentation on the Breeze website about the Custom EFContextProvider's Save Interceptor. You will need to create your own provider and implement the BeforeSaveEntity method. In that method you can set the UserId of the task to the current user just like you did with MVC4.

public class TasksContextProvider: EFContextProvider<YourExistingDbContext>  
{

  public override bool BeforeSaveEntity(EntityInfo entityInfo) 
  {
    if (entityInfo.Entity.GetType() == typeof(YourTask)
        && entityInfo.EntityState == EntityState.Added) 
    {
      // add your logic here to set the user and/or do validation
    }
  }

}
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Awesome, thanks! That's exactly what I needed! –  Alex Dresko Jan 23 '13 at 0:35
    
On a related note, I was hoping I wouldn't have to read through the mounds of Breeze documentation in order to make effective use of the tool, but it looks like I'd be shooting myself in the foot if I didn't. The thing is, I thought the point of Breeze was to make things.... a breeze. Now Breeze is starting to look somewhat complicated. I guess I need to look and see if the functionality provided by breeze is worth the effort I'm going to have to invest in order to use it properly. I remember the good ol' days where all I had to do was add a public static WebMethod to my page's code behind. –  Alex Dresko Jan 23 '13 at 0:39
    
The new MVC 4 SPA template demonstrates ASP forms auth and a means of passing the user information to the controller. A forthcoming Breeze version of that template shows how to apply the user information in the BeforeSaveEntity exactly as Bryant proposed (thanks Bryant!) –  Ward Jan 23 '13 at 19:04
1  
I am sympathetic to the complexity issue. We share your reaction to documentation: the more there is, the more we worry. I'm not buying a toaster with a huge manual. Unfortunately, we're all building software. While there is an easy, "no think" primrose path for using Breeze, the moment you start adding application-specific concerns (filtering your own data by user), you're veering from that path and heading for the woods. The documentation is your survival guide to the woods. We wish we knew a better way. We welcome suggestions. –  Ward Jan 23 '13 at 19:11

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