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I have javascript that opens a list of URLs in their own windows. I can use window.open for each, but the problem is that sometimes, the browser doesn't always open the windows in the order I have asked them to be opened, especially when there is a large number of URLs. The URLs are not in my domain so I can't wait for an onLoad event from the child. Is there any way to determine if the child window is open before I open the next? As a last resort I guess I can create a wait time between each open, but that's more of a hack, slows everything down and while will probably make the correct order more likely, it won't guarantee it. For example:

<script type='text/javascript'>
var urls = new Array();
urls[0] = 'http://www.yahoo.com';
urls[1] = 'http://www.google.com';
urls[2] = 'http://www.facebook.com';

$(document).ready(function() {
    for (i=0; i<urls.length; i++) {
        window.open(urls[i]);
    }
});
</script>
share|improve this question
    
I'm curious if you did var dummy = window.open(urls[i]); if it would force the browser to wait until the window is open. –  Mike Christensen Jan 23 '13 at 0:00
    
I can't stand it when websites pop a bunch of windows, how do you keep the browser's popup blocker from blocking your windows? I can't stand when I go kayak and they pop all those windows, so I don't use kayak anymore. MMM, chrome only lets kayak open one window... –  Juan Mendes Jan 23 '13 at 0:07
    
my suggestion would be to chain the events. But why on earth would you want to do this is far beyond my comprehension but then again I've dealt with idiot graphic designers and project managers who've asked for weirder or stranger things –  James Daly Jan 23 '13 at 5:23
    
It's for an internal customer. They are given a series of URLs from complaining people and they need to see if the sites contain the offending content. It's not uncommon to open over 25 windows. As far as I know, the browser will open as many as windows as you want, it just doesn't always do it in a predictable order after a dozen or so. They want it in the right order so they can go down the list and say it's a valid or invalid complaint without having to verify the URL in the window as they often have very long and very similar URLs. –  Laila Sharshar Jan 23 '13 at 14:55
    
I hadn't tried assigning it to a variable since I didn't think there was anything useful I could do with the variable, but I'll give it a try. –  Laila Sharshar Jan 23 '13 at 15:02

2 Answers 2

Okay, I figured it out. There is no way to see of a child window in a remote URL is open. That's true. However, if you open a file in your domain who's only job is to alert the parent that it's open, then redirect to the remote URL, that works. Something like this:

<script type="text/javascript" src="js/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type='text/javascript'>
var urls = new Array();
urls[0] = 'http://www.yahoo.com';
urls[1] = 'http://www.google.com';
urls[2] = 'http://www.facebook.com';
urls[3] = 'http://www.linkedin.com';
urls[4] = 'http://www.twitter.com';
$(document).ready(function() {
    var interval = null;
    function doNext(i) {
        if (i < urls.length) {
            // console.log("Doing: " + i);
            childWin = window.open('tst2.jsp?i=' + i + '&url=' + urls[i]);
            interval = setInterval(function() {waitForIt(i);}, 1000);
            waitForIt(i);
        }
    }

    function waitForIt(i) {
        if (document.getElementById("urls" + i).checked == false) {
            // console.log('wait for: ' + i);
        } else {
            clearInterval(interval);
            if (i < urls.length) {
                doNext(i+1);
            }
        }
    }

    doNext(0);
});
</script>
<input type="checkbox" id="urls0">http://www.yahoo.com<br>
<input type="checkbox" id="urls1">http://www.google.com<br>
<input type="checkbox" id="urls2">http://www.facebook.com<br>
<input type="checkbox" id="urls3">http://www.linkedin.com<br>
<input type="checkbox" id="urls4">http://www.twitter.com<br>

then, in tst2.jsp, something like this:

<script>
opener.document.getElementById("urls" + <%=request.getParameter("i")%>).checked = true;
// console.log("Set variable");
window.location = '<%= request.getParameter("url") %>';
</script>

Also, one note, the number of windows you can open depends on the browser. Firefox can be configured to anything. It looks like Chrome is limited to 20. I'm not sure about IE.

share|improve this answer

You are probably limited in the number of windows you can open, they are probably being reused after a number of calls.

open() is supposed to be a blocking call, so it always waits until the browser has at least opened a new window before moving on to the next one.

You may try adding a random parameter as the second parameter to open to try to keep the browser from reusing windows if they were assigned default names.

// No guarantee that the name generated is unique, but if that's your only problem
// you should be OK
window.open(urls[i], "name" + new Date() + Math.random() );
share|improve this answer
    
As far as I know, there's no limit on the number of windows. I actually do name it in my real application, as opposed to the sample code above so that may be why it's letting me. I often open 10 - 100 URLs. (See my reason for doing such a ridiculous thing above in my follow up comment). It only really runs into a problem when I open more than a dozen or so. –  Laila Sharshar Jan 23 '13 at 15:07

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