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Possible Duplicate:
Response.Redirect causes System.Threading.ThreadAbortException

ASP/C#.NET (web forms, not MVC)

UPDATE: Just found a related post (likely rendering this a duplicate): Response.Redirect causes System.Threading.ThreadAbortException

~ ~ ~

After a good bit of research, I have come to the understanding that, in general, when using Response.Redirect(), it is better to pass FALSE for the second parameter, to avoid System.Threading.ThreadAbortException. (http://blogs.msdn.com/b/tmarq/archive/2009/06/25/correct-use-of-system-web-httpresponse-redirect.aspx)

My question is, "Is there a recommended way (pattern) for managing (namely skipping) processing in page events that fire after the redirect, when false is passed for the second parameter?"

This is mostly a problem for me when I am checking for and redirecting on an expired session in Page_Load(). It seems very tedious to have to perhaps set a "_Redirected" flag every time I redirect and then check that flag at the top of every event. I haven't had to worry about this in the past because I always passed TRUE for the second parameter, not knowing any better.

Below is some code showing what I don't want to have to do (check _Redirected before processing each event). Perhaps what I'm looking for is a better Session Expiration Processing pattern.

Any suggestions on how to improve this processing, would be greatly appreciated.

private bool _Redirected = false;    

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  if (Session["key"] == null)
  {
    Response.Redirect("SessionExpired.aspx", false);
    Context.ApplicationInstance.CompleteRequest();

    _Redirected = true;
  }       
}

protected void Page_PreRender(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  if (!_Redirected)
  {
    // do Page_PreRender() stuff...
  }
}

protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  if (!_Redirected)
  {
    // do Button1_Click() stuff...

    Response.Redirect("Button1Page.aspx", false);
    Context.ApplicationInstance.CompleteRequest();

    _Redirected = true;
  }
}

protected void Button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  if (!_Redirected)
  {
    // do Button2_Click() stuff...

    Response.Redirect("Button2Page.aspx", false);
    Context.ApplicationInstance.CompleteRequest();

    _Redirected = true;
  }
}

~ ~ ~

[01/24/2013] In response to Chris Lively (thank you, btw), here is simplified code that I believe is similar to what you tested. I am still seeing Button1_Click() execute on post back after the Response.Redirect(url, false) with .CompleteRequest() in Page_Load().

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  if (this.IsPostBack)
  {
    Response.Redirect("Redirect.aspx", false);
    Context.ApplicationInstance.CompleteRequest();
  }
}

protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  Response.Write("Button1 clicked!");
}

This behavior is corroborated by this response http://stackoverflow.com/a/12957854/1530187 to the similar post I noted above in my update.

Any idea what I'm doing wrong that would cause the page to continue executing after redirect?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Chris Lively, Donal Fellows, SWeko, hjpotter92, JDB Jan 24 '13 at 18:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
That code is pretty much exactly what I tested. Weird. I was using asp.net 4.5 –  Chris Lively Jan 25 '13 at 0:52
    
Curious. I'm using 4. Maybe they did something magical with 4.5. I'm still on 4.0 with 2010, so I don't think I can test 4.5. –  jweekes Jan 25 '13 at 5:22

1 Answer 1

You referenced a pretty good article, but your code doesn't reflect what the author suggested as a way to do this "correctly". Namely:

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  if (Session["key"] == null)
  {
    Response.Redirect("SessionExpired.aspx", false);
    Context.ApplicationInstance.CompleteRequest();
  }       
}

UPDATE
I put together a very simple sample application. All it had was two form pages.
The first page had a button on it that did a response.write. I put a breakpoint on this line. In the page_load method I put a redirect followed immediately by a call to CompleteRequest. This redirect occured was set to occur if the page was posting back.

All the second page did was emit "hello"

I then ran the application, which pulled up the first form. I clicked the button. The break point was never hit and it redirected. This was exactly what I expected it to do. Namely, the page_load method caught the postback, performed a redirect and completed the request immediately without further processing of the page.

This means that there is absolutely no reason to put the if (!_Redirected) code in each of your button clicks. All you need to do is copy/ paste the code I have at the top of this answer. It will prevent those clicks from being called.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. You are correct; I forgot to include "Contect.ApplicationInstance.CompleteRequest()" in my example code. I have added it. I am still stuck with what to do with the residual events, which will still fire after the redirect. Is it common to wrap all events with a check similar to this? Is it just bad practice to redirect from Page_Load()? Regardless, thanks again! –  jweekes Jan 23 '13 at 15:59
    
@jweekes: see update. –  Chris Lively Jan 24 '13 at 5:19
    
Note: CompleteRequest still won't completely stop execution instantly always. It'll continue executing for a while until ASP.Net kills the thread. It's best to put an infinite loop afterwards to avoid this and just wait until the thread is killed –  Earlz Jan 24 '13 at 18:31
    
@ChrisLively Thank you again, but I am not seeing the behavior you describe--see my update to my post above where I added code similar to what you described. The button click event is still executing for me, even after the .Redirect() with .CompleteRequest(). –  jweekes Jan 24 '13 at 18:34
1  
Um, I'm thinking an infinite loop is probably worse than the exception I'm trying to avoid, but thanks, @Earlz. –  jweekes Jan 24 '13 at 18:36

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