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I'm running a Python script through the sh module and it is crashing during execution. Upon crashing, it gives me a readout of the first few lines of stderr, but it tells me that there are more errors and that I should see e.stderr, but I can't figure out how to do that because I don't know what e is. How can I access the rest of my stderr file? Thanks.

EDIT: Here is the error:

STDERR:
mydir/test.py:22: UserWarning: gzip transfer encoding is experimental!
  br.set_handle_gzip(True)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "mydir/test.py", line 142, in <module>
    run(sys.argv[1]);
  File "mydir/test.py", line 13, in run
    scrape(browser,folderName);
  File "mydir/test.py", line 46, in scrape
    processResponse(browser,folderName,1);
  File "mydir/test.py", line 121, in processResponse
    urllib.urlencode(data));
  File "/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/site-packages/mechanize-0.2.6.dev_20130122-py2.7.egg/mechanize/_mechanize.py", line 203, in open
    return self._mech_open(url, data, timeout=timeout)
  File "/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/site-pac... (4278 more, please see e.stderr)
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e.stderr is likely a variable in some part of your script or a library you imported. How about you post the error? –  Adam Cadien Jan 23 '13 at 1:56
    
@AdamCadien Thanks for your response. I just added the error above. Let me know if there is any more information you need. –  abw333 Jan 23 '13 at 2:13
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2 Answers

Check out this answer: what does mechanize tag br.set_handle_gzip do?

Hopefully that reduces the number of errors by more than 1.

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The message about e.stderr comes from the sh module.

(https://github.com/amoffat/sh/blob/30bd191a4f966bcf82c5666c56aeb1060d035920/sh.py#L148)

I wrote a simple program error.py that just writes a lot to stderr and then exits with a non-zero return code. To get rid of the message, simply use a try/except bloc:

import sh

cmd = sh.Command("./error.py")
try:
   c = cmd()
except sh.ErrorReturnCode, e:
    print e.stderr
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