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I have two branches I am working from. One is forked from master, and the second is forked from master, but depends on changes in the first branch. I want to submit my first branch for review. After it is approved, it will be rebased onto master.

Is there any way I can start working on second branch without having the first changeset in master? My original idea was to rebase the second branch from the first branch, and then when the first branch was rebased onto master, to rebase the second changeset onto master. Is that feasible? If not, what is the correct approach?

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So you have master, branch1 that depends on master, and branch2 that depends on branch1, is that correct? –  R0MANARMY Jan 23 '13 at 4:25
    
yes, that is correct –  mvid Jan 23 '13 at 4:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Disclaimer: This assumes Branch2 is either local to your repository, or it's public but no one else will pull from/work on it. If someone does try to work on it and you preform the operations below, it will likely cause all kinds of headaches.


You should be able to accomplish your branch manipulation with the --onto parameter of rebase command. It is pretty powerful and will let you (at least try to) move just about any range of commits on top of just about any other commit.

For your situation, let's assuming you have a graph that looks something like this

       e -- f            <-- Branch2
      /
a -- b                   <-- Master
      \
       c -- d            <-- Branch1

and you want to turn it into something like the one below so you can continue working on Branch2 while Branch1 is waiting merge approval.

a -- b                   <-- Master
      \
       c -- d            <-- Branch1
             \
              e -- f     <-- Branch2

It should be able to accomplish that with the command

git rebase --onto branch1 master branch2

After Branch1 has been merged into master, suppose the repository looks like this

a -- b ------- g          <-- Master
      \       /
       c -- d             <-- Branch1
             \
              e -- f      <-- Branch2

You can then put Branch2 back onto master using the following command

git rebase --onto master branch1 branch2

resulting in a repository that looks like this

                 e -- f   <-- Branch2
                /
a -- b ------- g          <-- Master
      \       /
       c -- d             <-- Branch1

Sorry Branch2 keeps jumping between top and bottom.

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You have two 'f's in the bottom two examples. Also, the merge from branch1 to master is unfortunate. –  Mike Monkiewicz Jan 23 '13 at 13:13
    
@MikeMonkiewicz Thank you for catching the double f's. Why is merge from branch1 to master unfortunate? I understand this imaginary repository graph would allow a fast forward merge into master and a second rebase would be unnecessary. However, question asked about stacked branches, so a merge commit was more useful for explaining what to do in that situation. –  R0MANARMY Jan 23 '13 at 15:26
    
Again assuming that the branches are local, I think the stacked branches example would have been just fine with rebase. After all, rebasing is almost always preferable to merging in git if possible. –  Mike Monkiewicz Jan 25 '13 at 4:36
    
@MikeMonkiewicz They both serve their purpose. You would never use rebase to re-integrate a branch into its parent. Also, with long running branches, rebase may not always be an option. –  R0MANARMY Jan 25 '13 at 6:13

If what you mean is you need changes from branch 1 in branch 2, you probably just want to git cherry-pick the changes you need from branch 1 into branch 2. This does precisely what you're looking for without the need for any complicated rebase schemes.

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Hi Anton, I think cherry-pick is not a good idea, when you use the cherry-pick, it looks like the same submit, but actually, it is totally new commit, when you want to merge your code into the repo later, it will face some problem because you already merge it in the branch 1. –  Tim Jan 23 '13 at 3:23
    
Tim is correct that cherry-pick will make a new commit with a different sha1 hash, which means the commit will show up twice in your history once both branches are merged back to master. However, the 2 changes will not conflict. This is a downside of cherry-pick, but I still feel it is the simplest solution to the problem given. –  Anton I. Sipos Jan 23 '13 at 3:51

It seems you are using the gerrit to do the code review.

You can do it like this:

When the branch 1 was submitted and merged into the repo, you can do it like this:

git fetch origin

and directly rebase the change from branch1, such as git rebase origin/master

Br, Tim

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