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This might be a stupid question but I cannot figure this out for the life of me nor can I find a reference online which answers my question.

I have been using Edwin (this is my first time using Emacs) to follow along with the MIT Opencourseware 6.001 class and I cannot figure out how to load a file.

Upon startup, I type C-x C-f to make a new file "test.scm". I then input some Scheme code and type C-x C-s to save it.

But then if I close Edwin, start it back up,and type C-x C-f test.scm, I just get a blank slate. If instead I type M-x dired, scroll to test.scm and hit RET, I still get a blank slate. The file takes up some space in windows so I don't think the issue is with saving but rather loading (especially since I similarly cannot load the premade .scm files provided by MIT)

I am running MIT/GNU Scheme on Windows 7 if that matters...

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jan 23 '13 at 3:50

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

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Welcome to Programmers. Please take a moment to read the site's FAQ where you'll find good information to asking questions here. This question is off-topic. A good rule to follow is if your question has you in front of your IDE it belongs on StackOverflow. If your question has you in front of a whiteboard it belongs on Programmers. Please don't re-ask this on SO as this can be migrated. –  Walter Jan 23 '13 at 3:05
    
Ah sorry, I didn't realize that StackOverflow (with no suffix) was already for programming. I will migrate the question (once I figure out how) –  user79216 Jan 23 '13 at 3:42
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1 Answer

There is an open bug report for this: http://savannah.gnu.org/bugs/?35250.

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