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I have this piece of code; it works when you directly write the arguments to system(), and doesn't work if you pass the arguments to it. Any help please?

char dest[100];
char file[50];
char dir[100];

printf("Enter source path: ");
scanf("%s", dir);

printf("Enter filename: ");
scanf("%s", file);

printf("Enter destination path: ");
scanf("%s", dest);

system("move \"c:\\users\\putty.exe\" g:\\ \n" );  /* <--works        */
system("move \"%s%s\" %s", dir,file,dest);         /* <--doesn't work */
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can try this

char dest[100];
char file[50];
char dir[100];
char command[300];
printf("Enter source path: ");
scanf("%s", dir);
printf("Enter filename: ");
scanf("%s", file);
printf("Enter destination path: ");
scanf("%s", dest);
sprintf(command,"move %s%s %s", dir,file,dest);  
system(command); 
share|improve this answer
    
If the three path elements are 100, 50 and 100 characters long, the command string should probably be longer than 250 characters. Ideally, you'd modify those scanf() formats to specify the limits ("%99s" and "%49s") to avoid overflows, and consider using snprintf() or snprintf_s() rather than sprintf(). – Jonathan Leffler Jan 23 '13 at 4:29

The system() command is not a snprintf() substitute. You would need to use snprintf() and then system():

char command[1024];
...
snprintf(command, sizeof(command), "move \"%s%s\" %s", dir, file, dest);
system(command);

Or, given that you're on Windows, you can use snprintf_s() instead of snprintf(). You might also note that if the user does not leave a backslash at the end of the dir value, then the last component of the directory and filename are combined. You should probably use:

snprintf(command, sizeof(command), "move \"%s\\%s\" %s", dir, file, dest);

Although the Windows kernel is quite happy with slashes in the path name, the command processor is less so. Since you are not calling the operating system directly but rather the command processor to run a program, you need to use backslashes, I believe.

Note that your compiler should have been telling you that you were not calling system() correctly. The header is <stdlib.h> and that states that the function takes just one argument.

ISO/IEC 9899:2011 §7.22.4.8 The system function

Synopsis

¶1 #include <stdlib.h>

int system(const char *string);

Description

¶2 If string is a null pointer, the system function determines whether the host environment has a command processor. If string is not a null pointer, the system function passes the string pointed to by string to that command processor to be executed in a manner which the implementation shall document; this might then cause the program calling system to behave in a non-conforming manner or to terminate.

If your compiler was not telling you that you were misusing system() with your second call, or not complaining that system() was declared before it was used, then you need to turn up the warnings level on your compilation, or get a better compiler. If it was warning you, you need to pay attention to what it says. Remember, the compiler knows more about C than you do.

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