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I'll explain in math, here's the transformation I'm struggling to write Scheme code for:

(f '(a b c) '(d e f)) = '(ad (+ bd ae) (+ cd be af) (+ ce bf) cf)

Where two letters together like ad means (* a d).

I'm trying to write it in a purely functional manner, but I'm struggling to see how. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Here are some examples:

(1mul '(0 1) '(0 1)) = '(0 0 1)
(1mul '(1 2 3) '(1 1)) = '(1 3 5 3)
(1mul '(1 2 3) '(1 2)) = '(1 4 7 6)
(1mul '(1 2 3) '(2 1)) = '(2 5 8 3)
(1mul '(1 2 3) '(2 2)) = '(2 6 10 6)
(1mul '(5 5 5) '(1 1)) = '(5 10 10 5)
(1mul '(0 0 1) '(2 5)) = '(0 0 2 5)
(1mul '(1 1 2 3) '(2 5)) = '(2 7 9 16 15)

So, the pattern is like what I posted at the beginning:

Multiply the first number in the list by every number in the second list (ad, ae, af) and then continue along, (bd, be, bf, cd, ce, cf) and arrange the numbers "somehow" to add the corresponding values. The reason I call it overlapping is because you can sort of visualize it like this:

(list
       aa'
    (+ ba' ab')
    (+ ca' bb' ac')
        (+ cb' bc')
               cc')

Again,

(f '(a b c) '(d e f)) = '(ad (+ bd ae) (+ cd be af) (+ ce bf) cf)

However, not just for 3x3 lists, for any sized lists.

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Your parenthesis are not balanced, so I am not sure what you want. Please clarify. –  leppie Jan 23 '13 at 6:45
    
Where have you come across this type of operation? And what do you want to achieve using this operation? –  soegaard Jan 23 '13 at 14:36
    
This is similar to multiplication by hand. This page on binary multiplication can help show what I mean:cs.uaf.edu/~cs301/notes/Chapter5/node5.html –  snario Jan 23 '13 at 20:16
    
Your grouping of terms looked kooky to me... until I realized that you're probably implicitly using place value. That is, you're using the list '(1 2 3) to represent the number 123. In that case, your grouping associates terms that have the same number of zeros. Is that correct? –  John Clements Jan 23 '13 at 22:20
    
This looks like polynomial multiplication. –  Tyr May 21 '13 at 12:55
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's my code. It's in racket

#lang racket

(define (drop n xs)
  (cond [(<= n 0) xs]
        [(empty? xs) '()]
        [else (drop (sub1 n) (rest xs))]))        

(define (take n xs)
  (cond [(<= n 0) '()]
        [(empty? xs) '()]
        [else (cons (first xs) (take (sub1 n) (rest xs)))]))        


(define (mult as bs)
  (define (*- a b)
    (list '* a b))
  (define degree (length as))
  (append 
   (for/list ([i  (in-range 1 (+ 1 degree))])
     (cons '+ (map *- (take i as) (reverse (take i bs)))))
   (for/list ([i  (in-range 1 degree)])
     (cons '+ (map *- (drop i as) (reverse (drop i bs)))))))

The for/lists are just ways of mapping over a list of numbers and collecting the result in a list. If you need, I can reformulate it just maps.

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Is this a good candidate for recursion? Not sure, but here's a a direct translation of what you asked for.

(define (f abc def)
  (let ((a (car abc)) (b (cadr abc)) (c (caddr abc))
        (d (car def)) (e (cadr def)) (f (caddr def)))
    (list (* a d)
          (+ (* b d) (* a e))
          (+ (* c d) (* b e) (* a f))
          (+ (* c e) (* b f))
          (* c f))))
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I should have explained more. What I need is a function that does that for two lists of arbitrary length not just 3x3 –  snario Jan 23 '13 at 12:13
    
@soegaard raises a good point; if you just want to cross-multiple the lists then his answer is the most meaningful. Let's sort that out before we go any further. –  Faiz Jan 23 '13 at 13:30
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Is it correct to assume, that you want to do this computation?

(a+b+c)*(d+e+f) = a(d+e+f) + b(d+e+f) + c(d+e+f) 
                = ad+ae+af + bd+be+bf + cd+ce+cf

If so, this is simple:

(define (f xs ys)
   (* (apply + xs) (apply + ys))

If you are interested in the symbolic version:

#lang racket
(define (f xs ys)
  (define (fx x)
    (define (fxy y)
      (list '* x y))
    (cons '+ (map fxy ys)))
  (cons '+ (map fx xs)))

And here is a test:

> (f '(a b c) '(d e f))
'(+ (+ (* a d) (* a e) (* a f)) 
    (+ (* b d) (* b e) (* b f)) 
    (+ (* c d) (* c e) (* c f)))
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, that's not exactly it, I need to generate a list that will be using that computation, but it needs to put the values in the correct places too. I've added some examples and more information in the first post. –  snario Jan 23 '13 at 13:57
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