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I've searched for a while and been struggling to find this, I'm trying to generate several random, unique numbers is C#. I'm using System.Random, and I'm using a datetime.now.ticks seed:

public Random a = new Random(DateTime.Now.Ticks.GetHashCode());
private void NewNumber()
  {
     MyNumber = a.Next(0, 10);
  }

I'm calling NewNumber() regularly, but the problem is I often get repeated numbers. Some people suggested because I was declaring the random every time I did it, it would not produce a random number, so I put the declaration outside my function. Any suggestions or better ways than using System.Random ? Thank you

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2  
    
As long as you are only creating the Random object once, you shouldn't have a problem. If you are wanting the numbers to be unique (haven't already had that number) then you'll need to add extra than just using Random – RoneRackal Jan 23 '13 at 5:57
1  
Are you looking for "permutation of numbers 1..10" instead of "random number in range 1..10"? (Definiitely give you 10 unique numbers in random sequence) – Alexei Levenkov Jan 23 '13 at 6:00
1  
why don't you generate guid? do you need int or any unique string is enough? – Burhan Uddin Jan 23 '13 at 6:00
2  
What do you expect your code to produce after all ten unique values are produced? What should be 11th value (of 10)? – Andrew Savinykh Jan 23 '13 at 6:02
up vote 12 down vote accepted

I'm calling NewNumber() regularly, but the problem is I often get repeated numbers.

Random.Next doesn't guarntee the number to be unique. Also your range is from 0 to 10 and chances are you will get duplicate values. May be you can setup a list of int and insert random numbers in the list after checking if it doesn't contain the duplicate. Something like:

public Random a = new Random(); // replace from new Random(DateTime.Now.Ticks.GetHashCode());
                                // Since similar code is done in default constructor internally
public List<int> randomList = new List<int>();
int MyNumber = 0;
private void NewNumber()
{
    MyNumber = a.Next(0, 10);
    if (!randomList.Contains(MyNumber))
        randomList.Add(MyNumber);
}
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1  
+1. Also for anything more than 10 list would be poor choice, HashSet would be better. And there is no need to initialize random this way - similar code done in default constructor anyway... – Alexei Levenkov Jan 23 '13 at 6:02
    
Thanks heaps that worked perfectly! – Christian Peut Jan 23 '13 at 6:11

You might try shuffling an array of possible ints if your range is only 0 through 9. This adds the benefit of avoiding any conflicts in the number generation.

var nums = Enumerable.Range(0, 10).ToArray();
var rnd = new Random();

// Shuffle the array
for (int i = 0;i < nums.Length;++i)
{
    int randomIndex = rnd.Next(nums.Length);
    int temp = nums[randomIndex];
    nums[randomIndex] = nums[i];
    nums[i] = temp;
}

// Now your array is randomized and you can simply print them in order
for (int i = 0;i < nums.Length;++i)
    Console.WriteLine(nums[i]);
share|improve this answer
    
I just tested that one out and it worked well too! thanks very much! – Christian Peut Jan 23 '13 at 6:13
    
Beware! That is an incorrect shuffle implementation! I'll post a correct implementation in a moment. – Matthew Watson Jan 23 '13 at 9:03
    
(Too late to edit my comment above now). Please see my post below for a correct implementation, as well as a link to some discussion about it. – Matthew Watson Jan 23 '13 at 9:13
    
Why not just Enumerable.Range(0, 10).OrderBy(x => rnd.NextDouble()).ToArray(); ? – thepirat000 Nov 14 '15 at 20:00
    
@thepirat000 The only real reason would be speed. For 10 elements it obviously doesn't make a difference, but it will for large collections.OrderBy() is likely an O(N log N) algorithm, where the shuffle is O(N). – itsme86 Nov 15 '15 at 1:59

I'm posting a correct implementation of a shuffle algorithm, since the other one posted here doesn't produce a uniform shuffle.

As the other answer states, for small numbers of values to be randomized, you can simply fill an array with those values, shuffle the array, and then use however many of the values that you want.

The following is an implementation of the Fisher-Yates Shuffle (aka the Knuth Shuffle). (Read the "implementation errors" section of that link (search for "always selecting j from the entire range of valid array indices on every iteration") to see some discussion about what is wrong with the other implementation posted here.)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    static class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Shuffler shuffler = new Shuffler();
            List<int> list = new List<int>{ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };
            shuffler.Shuffle(list);

            foreach (int value in list)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(value);
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>Used to shuffle collections.</summary>

    public class Shuffler
    {
        /// <summary>Creates the shuffler with a <see cref="MersenneTwister"/> as the random number generator.</summary>

        public Shuffler()
        {
            _rng = new Random();
        }

        /// <summary>Shuffles the specified array.</summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T">The type of the array elements.</typeparam>
        /// <param name="array">The array to shuffle.</param>

        public void Shuffle<T>(IList<T> array)
        {
            for (int n = array.Count; n > 1; )
            {
                int k = _rng.Next(n);
                --n;
                T temp = array[n];
                array[n] = array[k];
                array[k] = temp;
            }
        }

        private System.Random _rng;
    }
}
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Depending on what you are really after you can do something like this:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace SO14473321
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            UniqueRandom u = new UniqueRandom(Enumerable.Range(1,10));
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                Console.Write("{0} ",u.Next());
            }
        }
    }

    class UniqueRandom
    {
        private readonly List<int> _currentList;
        private readonly Random _random = new Random();

        public UniqueRandom(IEnumerable<int> seed)
        {
            _currentList = new List<int>(seed);
        }

        public int Next()
        {
            if (_currentList.Count == 0)
            {
                throw new ApplicationException("No more numbers");
            }

            int i = _random.Next(_currentList.Count);
            int result = _currentList[i];
            _currentList.RemoveAt(i);
            return result;
        }
    }
}
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Here's a "oneliner" as well:

//This code generates numbers between 1 - 100 and then takes 10 of them.
var result = Enumerable.Range(1,101).OrderBy(g => Guid.NewGuid()).Take(10).ToArray();
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Like where you've gone here. But why not: Enumerable.Range(0, 9).OrderBy(g => rand.NextDouble()).ToList() then you get the Range as per question. – SDK Jan 15 at 15:28

Try this:

private void NewNumber()
  {
     Random a = new Random(Guid.newGuid().GetHashCode());
     MyNumber = a.Next(0, 10);
  }
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2  
Please add an explanation. – OhBeWise Feb 23 at 17:52

You could also use a dataTable storing each random value, then simply perform the random method while != values in the dataColumn

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