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Sorry for my pure english.

I have two processes which can Read and Write data to the same value(my tests do it). Sometimes(one per ten times) the read method is fail with error ERROR_MORE_DATA and Value is 12. But I call Read method from the tests with 32 bytes.

By chance I looked to @err,hr in watch (GetLastError()) and saw ERROR_NOT_OWNER error code.I understand that second process is block the key and I must try again.

Can anybody approve my conclusions (MSDN is not say anything about this)? Can anybody will tell me other strange effects?

Thank you.

Update: I have UAC Virtualization. All changes are stored to the [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\VirtualStore\MACHINE\SOFTWARE] May be it is effect virtualization???

{
...
    char name[32] = "";
    grandchild.OpenValue("name").Read(name, _countof(name));
...
}
bool RegisteryStorageValue::Read(void* Buffer, size_t Size) throw (IOException)
{
    DWORD Value = DWORD(Size);
    DWORD rez = ::RegQueryValueEx(mKey, mName.c_str(), NULL, NULL, (BYTE*)Buffer, &Value);
    if (rez != ERROR_SUCCESS) // here I have 'rez = ERROR_MORE_DATA' and 'Value = 12'
        throw IOException(rez);
    return true;
}
bool RegisteryStorageValue::Write(Type type, const void* Buffer, size_t Size) throw (IOException)
{
    DWORD rez = ::RegSetValueEx(mKey, mName.c_str(), NULL, getRegType(type), (const BYTE*)Buffer, (DWORD)Size);
    if (rez != ERROR_SUCCESS)
        throw IOException(rez);
    return true;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Registry functions do not use GetLastError() to report errors. They return error codes directly. So the ERROR_NOT_OWNER is misleading, it is from an earlier Win32 API call, not the Registry calls.

There is no possible way you can pass in a Size value of 32 to RegQueryValueEx() and get back an ERROR_MORE_DATA error saying the data is actually 12 in size. RegQueryValueEx() does not work that way. Make sure your Size value is actually set to 32 upon entry to the Read() function and is not set to some other value.

Update: it is, however, possible for RegQueryValueEx() to report ERROR_MORE_DATA and return a data size that is twice as larger as what you requested, even if RegSetValueEx() is not actually passed that much data. When I ran your test code, I was able to get RegQueryValueEx() to sometimes (not every time) report a data size of 64 even though 32 was being requested. The reason is because RegSetValueExA(), which your code is actually calling, performs a data conversion from Ansi to Unicode for string types (REG_SZ, REG_MULTI_SZ and REG_EXPAND_SZ), and RegQueryValueExA(), which your code is actually calling, queries the raw bytes and performs a Unicode to Ansi conversion for string types. So while your writing code may be saving 32 char values, thus 32 bytes, the Registry is actually storing 32 wchar_t values instead, thus 64 bytes (it would be more if your input strings had non-ASCII characters in them). Chances are, RegQueryValueEx() is returning the raw bytes as-is instead of converting them, such as if RegSetValueEx() is saving the raw bytes first and then saving the data type afterwards, but RegQueryValueEx() is reading the raw bytes before the data type has been saved and thus does not know the data is a string type that needs converting.

Either way, this is a race condition between one thread/process reading while another thread/process is writing, issues with reading while the writing is caching data internally before flushing it, etc. Nothing you can do about this unless you synchronize the reads and writes, since the Registry API does not synchronize for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. The GetLastError() really stored by the another code. But I modify code to remember the input params and dispay the with output. And they are still the same: – diman Jan 23 '13 at 11:55
    
Before query: Size: 32 After query: Required Size: 12 Result: 234 – diman Jan 23 '13 at 11:59
    
What you describe should not be possible under normal conditions, so I have to suspect you are not in a normal situation. Are you running your app in a virtualized environment (VirtualPC, VMWare, Wine, etc) on a non-Windows PC, for instance? Something is likely hooking RegQueryValueEx() and altering its normal behavior. UAC alone will not do that. – Remy Lebeau Jan 23 '13 at 18:12
    
Windows 7 Professional SP 1. Not any virtual applications. Application have 32-bit architecture. There are only that. First process is write key. Second process try to read it in the same time. The key is exist before any changes. – diman Jan 24 '13 at 4:39
    
Please, see sample below – diman Jan 24 '13 at 5:37

I write sample for my question. I have repeate it issue on the third start.

If sample is complite you can see "Query complite" and "SetComplite" messages

On err you should saw: "error more data: ??"

#include <string>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <tchar.h>
#include <windows.h>


bool start(char* path, char* args)
{
    std::string cmd = path;
    cmd.push_back(' ');
    cmd.append(args);

    STARTUPINFO si = {0};
    PROCESS_INFORMATION pi = {0};
    BOOL res = ::CreateProcess(NULL, (LPSTR)cmd.c_str(), NULL, NULL, FALSE, 0, NULL, NULL, &si, &pi);
    if (res == FALSE)
        return false;

    ::CloseHandle(pi.hProcess);
    ::CloseHandle(pi.hThread);

    return true;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    HANDLE hEvent = ::CreateEvent(NULL, TRUE, FALSE, "Local/blah");

    if (argc == 1)
    {
        HKEY hKey;
        if (::RegCreateKey(HKEY_CURRENT_USER, "Software\\TestRegistry", &hKey) != ERROR_SUCCESS)
            return -1;

        char buffer[] = "Hello, Stack!";
        ::RegSetValueEx(hKey, "Value", 0, REG_SZ, (BYTE*)buffer, _countof(buffer));
        ::RegCloseKey(hKey);

        if (start(argv[0], "r") == false ||
            start(argv[0], "w") == false)
            return -2;
        ::Sleep(1000);
        ::SetEvent(hEvent);
    }
    else
    {
        if (argv[1][0] == 'r')
        {
            HKEY hKey;
            if (::RegOpenKey(HKEY_CURRENT_USER, "Software\\TestRegistry", &hKey) != ERROR_SUCCESS)
                return -1;

            char buffer[1024] = {0};
            if (::WaitForSingleObject(hEvent, 10000) == WAIT_TIMEOUT)
                return -3;
            for (size_t index = 0; index < 1000000; ++index)
            {
                DWORD dwType;
                DWORD dwSize = _countof(buffer);
                DWORD result = ::RegQueryValueEx(hKey, "Value", 0, &dwType, (LPBYTE)buffer, &dwSize);
                if (result == ERROR_SUCCESS)
                    continue;
                if (result == ERROR_MORE_DATA)
                {
                    ::printf_s("\nError more data: %d\n", dwSize);
                    return 1;
                }
            }
            ::RegCloseKey(hKey);
            ::printf_s("\nQuery completed\n");
        }
        else
        {
            ::srand(::GetTickCount());
            HKEY hKey;
            if (::RegOpenKey(HKEY_CURRENT_USER, "Software\\TestRegistry", &hKey) != ERROR_SUCCESS)
                return -1;

            const size_t word_size = 32;
            char dict[][word_size] =
            {
                "aaaaaaaa",
                "help me",
                "rape me",
                "in the pines",
                "argh",
            };
            char buffer[1024] = {0};

            if (::WaitForSingleObject(hEvent, 10000) == WAIT_TIMEOUT)
                return -3;
            for (size_t index = 0; index < 1000000; ++index)
            {
                DWORD dwType = REG_SZ;
                DWORD dwSize = word_size;
                DWORD result = ::RegSetValueEx(hKey, "Value", 0, dwType, (LPBYTE)dict[rand() % _countof(dict)], dwSize);
                if (result == ERROR_SUCCESS)
                    continue;
            }
            ::RegCloseKey(hKey);
            ::printf_s("\nSet completed\n");
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I ran the code on Win7 Home SP1 64bit as 32bit. I didn't get any errors. I tweaked the code so the main process would spawn endless child processes back to back. No errors. It took ~30 seconds for a writer process to finish writing. In that time frame, 10-11 reader processes were spawned and completed their reading. I let the code run for 5 minutes. No errors. I went back to the original code, tweaked the child processes to run in endless loops instead of exiting. Got the error almost immediately. Ran the same code again. No errors. Ran it again, got the error, but the reported size was 64! – Remy Lebeau Jan 24 '13 at 9:05
    
So this is likely going to be a timing issue between one thread/process reading while another thread/process is writing, issues with reading while the writing is caching data internally before flushing it, etc. Nothing you can do about this unless you synchronize the reads and writes, since the Registry API is not synchronizing for you. If I change the code to use RegOpenKeyEx() instead, specifying KEY_QUERY_VALUE and KEY_SET_VALUE permissions, I got the error several more times, each time reporting a size of 64. – Remy Lebeau Jan 24 '13 at 9:07

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