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I am having trouble with the AntiForgeryToken with ajax. I'm using ASP.NET MVC 3. I tried the solution in jQuery Ajax calls and the Html.AntiForgeryToken(). Using that solution, the token is now being passed:

var data = { ... } // with token, key is '__RequestVerificationToken'

$.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        data: data,
        datatype: "json",
        traditional: true,
        contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
        url: myURL,
        success: function (response) {
            ...
        },
        error: function (response) {
            ...
        }
    });

When I remove the [ValidateAntiForgeryToken] attribute just to see if the data (with the token) is being passed as parameters to the controller, I can see that they are being passed. But for some reason, the A required anti-forgery token was not supplied or was invalid. message still pops up when I put the attribute back.

Any ideas?

EDIT

The antiforgerytoken is being generated inside a form, but I'm not using a submit action to submit it. Instead, I'm just getting the token's value using jquery and then trying to ajax post that.

Here is the form that contains the token, and is located at the top master page:

<form id="__AjaxAntiForgeryForm" action="#" method="post">
    @Html.AntiForgeryToken()
</form>
share|improve this question
up vote 114 down vote accepted

You have incorrectly specified the contentType to application/json.

Here's an example of how this might work.

Controller:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        return View();
    }

    [HttpPost]
    [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
    public ActionResult Index(string someValue)
    {
        return Json(new { someValue = someValue });
    }
}

View:

@using (Html.BeginForm(null, null, FormMethod.Post, new { id = "__AjaxAntiForgeryForm" }))
{
    @Html.AntiForgeryToken()
}

<div id="myDiv" data-url="@Url.Action("Index", "Home")">
    Click me to send an AJAX request to a controller action
    decorated with the [ValidateAntiForgeryToken] attribute
</div>

<script type="text/javascript">
    $('#myDiv').submit(function () {
        var form = $('#__AjaxAntiForgeryForm');
        var token = $('input[name="__RequestVerificationToken"]', form).val();
        $.ajax({
            url: $(this).data('url'),
            type: 'POST',
            data: { 
                __RequestVerificationToken: token, 
                someValue: 'some value' 
            },
            success: function (result) {
                alert(result.someValue);
            }
        });
        return false;
    });
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks for the quick reply. Sorry I didn't mention it in the question; I'm not using the submit action at the moment. (The token is in a form, but i'm not using a submit button to submit it). Is it possible just to change the content type to something else? – OJ Raqueño Jan 23 '13 at 6:42
5  
The fact that you are not using a submit action doesn't change my answer much. All you need to do is subscribe to some other event (a button click, an anchor click or whatever and simply read the hidden field value). As far as sending the AJAX request is concerned you could use the example provided in my answer. You should not use contentType to application/json because the server is expecting the __RequestVerificationToken parameter to be part of the POST request payload using application/x-www-form-urlencoded. – Darin Dimitrov Jan 23 '13 at 6:45
    
I have updated my answer with an example. – Darin Dimitrov Jan 23 '13 at 6:48
    
That did it. Thank you! Been struggling with this for days! – OJ Raqueño Jan 23 '13 at 6:53
    
Very good and complete example. It worked right away for me. Thanks for the time saving. + 1 – Ben Junior Mar 21 '14 at 14:45

Another (less javascriptish) approach, that I did, goes something like this:

First, an Html helper

public static MvcHtmlString AntiForgeryTokenForAjaxPost(this HtmlHelper helper)
{
    var antiForgeryInputTag = helper.AntiForgeryToken().ToString();
    // Above gets the following: <input name="__RequestVerificationToken" type="hidden" value="PnQE7R0MIBBAzC7SqtVvwrJpGbRvPgzWHo5dSyoSaZoabRjf9pCyzjujYBU_qKDJmwIOiPRDwBV1TNVdXFVgzAvN9_l2yt9-nf4Owif0qIDz7WRAmydVPIm6_pmJAI--wvvFQO7g0VvoFArFtAR2v6Ch1wmXCZ89v0-lNOGZLZc1" />
    var removedStart = antiForgeryInputTag.Replace(@"<input name=""__RequestVerificationToken"" type=""hidden"" value=""", "");
    var tokenValue = removedStart.Replace(@""" />", "");
    if (antiForgeryInputTag == removedStart || removedStart == tokenValue)
        throw new InvalidOperationException("Oops! The Html.AntiForgeryToken() method seems to return something I did not expect.");
    return new MvcHtmlString(string.Format(@"{0}:""{1}""", "__RequestVerificationToken", tokenValue));
}

that will return a string

__RequestVerificationToken:"P5g2D8vRyE3aBn7qQKfVVVAsQc853s-naENvpUAPZLipuw0pa_ffBf9cINzFgIRPwsf7Ykjt46ttJy5ox5r3mzpqvmgNYdnKc1125jphQV0NnM5nGFtcXXqoY3RpusTH_WcHPzH4S4l1PmB8Uu7ubZBftqFdxCLC5n-xT0fHcAY1"

so we can use it like this

$(function () {
    $("#submit-list").click(function () {
        $.ajax({
            url: '@Url.Action("SortDataSourceLibraries")',
            data: { items: $(".sortable").sortable('toArray'), @Html.AntiForgeryTokenForAjaxPost() },
            type: 'post',
            traditional: true
        });
    });
});

And it seems to work!

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for innovation :P – Jimbo Jul 1 '13 at 13:39
3  
+1, nice. I just split the @Html.AntiForgeryTokenForAjaxPost in two in order to get the token name in one hand and its value in the other. Otherwise the syntax highlight is all messed up. It ends up like this (removed the single-quotes from the returned result too, so that it behaves like any MVC helper, for instance @Url): '@Html.AntiForgeryTokenName' : '@Html.AntiForgeryTokenValue' – Askolein Mar 18 '14 at 9:05
2  
nit nice. With this You have ajax call n cshtm file.... you should not mox js with razor that much in my opinion. – bunny1985 Mar 12 '15 at 7:49
    
I have downvoted this question because I believe that a simpler approach is to use AntiForgery static class. Getting HTML and replacing it instead of directly getting the token value is bad practice. ASP.NET is fully open source: github.com/ASP-NET-MVC/aspnetwebstack/blob/… (but now it could be worth to write another answer with a custom extension method that gets only the token) – usr-local-ΕΨΗΕΛΩΝ Jun 16 '15 at 8:41
    
Very clear and usefull one ! +1 for reusability and clearness – cdie Jan 27 at 11:07

it is so simple! when you use @Html.AntiForgeryToken() in your html code it means that server has signed this page and each request that is sent to server from this particular page has a sign that is prevented to send a fake request by hackers. so for this page to be authenticated by the server you should go through two steps:

1.send a parameter named __RequestVerificationToken and to gets its value use codes below:

<script type="text/javascript">
    function gettoken() {
        var token = '@Html.AntiForgeryToken()';
        token = $(token).val();
        return token;
   }
</script>

for example take an ajax call

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "/Account/Login",
    data: {
        __RequestVerificationToken: gettoken(),
        uname: uname,
        pass: pass
    },
    dataType: 'json',
    contentType: 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded; charset=utf-8',
    success: successFu,
});

and step 2 just decorate your action method by [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]

share|improve this answer

I know this is an old question. But I will add my answer anyway, might help someone like me.

If you dont want to process the result from the controller's post action, like calling the LoggOff method of Accounts controller, you could do as the following version of @DarinDimitrov 's answer:

@using (Html.BeginForm("LoggOff", "Accounts", FormMethod.Post, new { id = "__AjaxAntiForgeryForm" }))
{
    @Html.AntiForgeryToken()
}

<!-- this could be a button -->
<a href="#" id="ajaxSubmit">Submit</a>

<script type="text/javascript">
    $('#ajaxSubmit').click(function () {

        $('#__AjaxAntiForgeryForm').submit();

        return false;
    });
</script>
share|improve this answer

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