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so collision detection between 2 circles have been covered easily with simple condition like d < (r1 + r2), but what happens if the objects pass through each other during 2 timesteps?

I want to write a program that moves a cylinder in a pool of balls whose initial velocity and acceleration are not 0. if the thicknes complicates the calculations too much, then I may consider thin string of extremely hard wire with infinitismal thickness

collision problem illustrated, not drawn to scale http://i.imgur.com/An1GJxI.png

the cylinder is standing upright and aligned to the z-axis. its base is sliding in a single arbitrary direction in constant velocity, so its path will not change no matter how much force it gets from the collisions. the balls are moving in random motion, their own collision is calculated separately and not of concern here.

I want to use the penalty collision response, but I am having trouble determining the penetration depth. if there's an easier inelastic collision response, I could try that too.

because it's numerical solution, the position at each timestep is discreet. if the velocity is not being capped, the following problem could happen:

for a single time step, both the ball and the cylinder are moving, if their speed are just fast enough, the ball will move right through the cylinder from Tn to Tn+1, and fail the simple distance test d < (r1 + r2)

if the ball and sphere pass right through each other, how should I find the point of impact using 1st order approximation if the problem in the attached image happens? what is the correct condition to check to see if they collide or not? how should the penalty force be calculated to reflect the correct collision?

how should the penalty force be calculated? I am also a bit confused about calculating the proper penetration and the proper normal for collision force.

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Time step can be discreet but the calculation can still be continuous, and a continuous function can either trigger a extra time point or solve it internally. The equation is not really hard to solve in conjunction with the numeric integration. The easiest solution would be to trigger some kind of adaptive halving of time-step when the collision went past its hit point. –  joojaa Jan 23 '13 at 8:16
    
but I am doing numerical solution not analytical, the set up can only be solved numerically because the balls themselves are using numerical method to solve their own motions. it's true timestep can be varying, but I am not experienced enough in this to use anything beside constant timestep. –  TopTierTracker Jan 23 '13 at 8:52
    
A numerical solution does not mean discrete solution. The balls are probably using a continuous solution. For example Runge-kutta solver is continuous, not discrete. It tries to fit a continuous spline for integration, the integration of the approximation is exact. Likewise you could try to approximate the function with a spline and solve the exact collision point on that spline, for example with a space dividing scheme for a more accurate collision. –  joojaa Jan 23 '13 at 12:04
    
I will try it and see how it goes, but can you tell me how to calculate the point of impact and the normal vector? i.imgur.com/4JoUGZy.png in my program, I do not store previous velocities, so only tn+1 is available to me, I will linear interpolate into the past using the current velocity to calculate their point of impact, but I don't know how to do this. I have 2 velocity vector and 2 points, this means I can draw lines and find the point of intersection. that's fine, but the ball and the cylinder have their own radius which means this is not just a simple line intersect calculation. –  TopTierTracker Jan 24 '13 at 9:01
    
updated comment again can you tell me how to calculate the point of impact and the normal vector? i.imgur.com/vibnSTl.png in my program, I do not store previous velocities, only current time is available to me, I will linear interpolate into the past using the current velocity to calculate their point of impact, but I don't know how to do this. I have 2 velocity vector and 2 points, this means I can draw lines and find the point of intersection. that's fine, but the ball and the cylinder have their own radius which means this is not just a simple line intersect calculation. –  TopTierTracker Jan 24 '13 at 9:15

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