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is there any possibility to recognize within the constructor, which method of my service is called?

My example: I want to build a service which can be paused via SetPauseService(true), so that he won't do any work while paused. I don't want to check the pause flag in every method, so I'm trying to archive this in the constructor. My problem is, that the user has to call SetPauseService(false) while the service is paused to activate the service again.

[ServiceContract]
public class MyService
{

    private static bool isPaused;

    public MyService()
    {
        if (/*<Pseudo>*/ InvokedMethod != "SetPauseService" /*</Pseudo>*/)
        {
            if (isPaused)
            {
                throw new Exception("Cannot be executed, service is paused!");
            }
        }
    }

    [OperationContract]
    public void SetPauseService(bool status)
    {
        isPaused = status;
    }

    [OperationContract]
    public void DoWork()
    {
        /* ... */
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I believe what you are looking for can be found in:

OperationContext.Current.IncomingMessageHeaders.Action

This will expose the called operation. Is this what you needed ?

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This was what I was looking for. Thank you! –  Jan P. Jan 23 '13 at 8:45
    
My pleasure :P tho @daryal seems to also be pointing in a good direction regarding the implementation. Anyways glad to help. –  JanivZ Jan 23 '13 at 10:11

I think there are three options in this case;

  1. Write a WCF instance behaviour to check whether the service is paused. I assume that instance context mode of WCF service is not per call (e.g., you are not creating a new service instance for each call). Then, you may implement an instance behavior to return an instance of your service class, and why implementing you will have access to the request. You can check the method which is called and may process the response or just discard the request. Maybe you can use other behavior types to implement this; there may be more suitable ones (you can check them here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163302.aspx).

  2. Use Attributes in your methods to check whether service is paused. You can use PostSharp and inject code just before methods are being called. You can check the pause status before method calls and decide to execute or not. refer to postsharp

  3. Encapsulate you method codes in some action to check whether service is paused. You may write a common function accepting Actions as parameters; Ex.

    public void CheckPauseStatusAndExecuteIfTrue(Action action)
    {
        if (!this.isPaused)
        {
            action();
        }
    }
    

    ...

    [OperationContract]
    public void DoWork()
    {
        this.CheckPauseStatusAndExecuteIfTrue(() =>
        {
            //// write your method behavior
        });
    }
    
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If it is there, it's probably in OperationContext.Current . I just wouldn't rely on that: the construction is controlled by WCF. Make sure you use the 'PerCall' mode if you try.

The better approach is to implement a custom parameter inspector. (implement IParameterInspector and bind it in a behavior) You can use the method object BeforeCall(string operationName, object[] inputs) to do the work.

Either way, I would vote against 'pausing' a service, because connections will pile up from clients. It might be better to simply stop the servicehost, handle the 'pause' in the client and start it again after you have done your work.

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