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I want to stop a looping thread when a signal was emitted so here is my code

void  MyThread::stopWatchingThread()
{
    qDebug()<<"MyThread::stopWatchingThread()";    
    Keep_running=false;
    qDebug()<<"MyThread::stopWatchingThread Keep_running"<<Keep_running;
    ...
}

void MyThread::run()
{
  qDebug()<<"MyThread::run()";
  qDebug()<<"MyThread::run Keep_running"<<Keep_running;  
  while(Keep_running)
    {
     ...
     }
  qDebug()<<"MyThread::run Keep_running"<<Keep_running;
  Keep_running=false;
  qDebug()<<"MyThread::run Keep_running"<<Keep_running;
}

void Watcher::Init()
{
    WatchingThread=new MyThread(this->L_RootToWatch);
    connect(this,SIGNAL(stopmonotiring()),WatchingThread, SLOT(stopWatchingThread()));
...
}
void Watcher::StartWatching()
{
    WatchingThread->start();
}

void Watcher::StopWatching()
{
    emit stopmonotiring();        
}

So every thing goes all right but my problem is that Keep_running never get false value in MyThread::run() after emitting stopWatchingThread and so while loop for ever. What did I miss ? any help will be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Have you checked if you actually enter into MyThread::stopWatchingThread()? –  sashoalm Jan 23 '13 at 9:13
    
Yes and my Keep_running was false –  ouou Jan 23 '13 at 9:16
    
Are you sure that Keep_Running is the same variable? Print its address (use qDebug() << &Keep_Running;) both from run() and from MyThread::stopWatchingThread() and compare –  sashoalm Jan 23 '13 at 9:17
    
Also, did you check, that you are actually iterating over your while loop? As in: it is not hanging in the first iteration waiting for some event, e.g. network IO, that never occurs. –  user1252434 Jan 23 '13 at 9:30
    
My while loop tests only Keep_running and it is not waiting for any event,@satuon yes it is the same variable. –  ouou Jan 23 '13 at 10:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Don't create threaded classes explicitly in Qt. Instead, create a worker object, move that object to a QThread, then call start() on the QThread. Here's a quick example:

class Worker : public QObject
{
  Q_OBJECT
public:
  Worker( QObject * parent = 0 )
    : QObject( parent )
  {}

public slots:
  void doWork( ... )
  { 
    // do work here
  }

  void stopMonitoring()
  { 
    emit finished();
  }

signals:
  void finished();
};

int main()
{
  Worker * w = new Worker();
  QThread * thread = new QThread();
  QObject::connect( w, SIGNAL(finished()), thread, SLOT(quit())
  QObject::connect( w, SIGNAL(finished()), w, SLOT(deleteLater())
  QObject::connect( thread, SIGNAL(finished()), thread, SLOT(deleteLater())
  w->moveToThread( thread );
  thread->start();

  // some other object emits a signal connected to the 'doWork()' slot.
}

I omitted some of the standard QApplication boiler-plate, but you have that already if you're using Qt. This should get you started.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your time it is working finally :) –  ouou Jan 25 '13 at 8:30

As your run() method is blocking and the event loop never entered, the slot stopWatchingThread will never be called. You must call exec() and not block the event loop by a spinning loop in run(). Either that, or have the watcher thread call stopWatchingThread directly instead of using a signal/slot connection. I'd go for the latter. keepRunning will be accessed from multiple threads then, so you have to protect it using a QMutex, QReadWriteLock or QAtomic. (Start with QMutex, it's easiest).

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If you use an event loop in your thread just post the quit() signal to the thread object.

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thank you for your response, What did you mean by event loop? is it the while block? I called quit() in stopWatchingThread() after setting Keep_running but in vain no effect. –  ouou Jan 23 '13 at 9:03
    
You start the event loop by calling QThread::exec() from your run() method. See doc.qt.digia.com/qt/qthread.html#exec –  sashoalm Jan 23 '13 at 9:10
    
An infinite/long running while loop will render the event loop useless. –  Frank Osterfeld Jan 23 '13 at 9:38
    
Of course, but I didn't say from inside his while loop. He should just remove this while loop, call exec(), and use a timer with zero interval to do his processing. –  sashoalm Jan 23 '13 at 9:39
    
I need to maintain the while loop (so I can handle the event of file creation inside of a watched directory : using inotify ...),I tried to call stopWatchingThread from Watcher without signal/slot and protect Keep_running with a QMutex but in vain MyThread still running even after destruction and I get QThread: Destroyed while thread is still running –  ouou Jan 23 '13 at 12:29

Maybe your C++ compiler optimizes away the read operation on Keep_running. Try declaring it as volatile, which tells the compiler that this variable might change "unexpectedly", e.g. from other threads or hardware interrupts.

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Thank you for your time, I change it to volatile, same result :( –  ouou Jan 23 '13 at 9:04

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