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I have ArrayList, which containst football teams (class Team). Teams have points and i want to sort them by number of points.

 public class Team {
     private int points;
     private String name;

     public Team(String n)
     {
         name = n;
     }

     public int getPoints
     {
         return points;
     }

     public void addPoints(boolean win)
 {
            if (win==true)
            {
    points = points + 3;
            }

            else if (win==false)
            {
            points = points + 1;
            }

}
 //...
 }

Main Class:

 List<Team> lteams = new ArrayList<Team>;

 lteams.add(new Team("FC Barcelona"));
 lteams.add(new Team("Arsenal FC"));
 lteams.add(new Team("Chelsea"));

 //then adding 3 points to Chelsea and 1 point to Arsenal

 lteams.get(2).addPoints(true);
 lteams.get(1).addPoints(false);

 //And want sort teams by points (first index with most points). 

I did my comparator.

 public class MyComparator implements Comparator<Team> {


    @Override
    public int compare(Team o1, Team o2) {
        if (o1.getPoints() > o2.getPoints())
         {
             return 1;
         }
        else if (o1.getPoints() < o2.getPoints())
        {
            return -1;
        }
        return 0;    
    } 

}

now I wanna use it (in main class)

 Colections.sort(lteams, new MyComparator());

I want to see:

  1. Chelsea
  2. Arsenal
  3. Barcelona

But it doesn't sort.

share|improve this question
    
How are you adding points to the team? In the code you included the team objects are placed directly into the list, you show no separate references to them. – Perception Jan 23 '13 at 8:50
    
Check this link:stackoverflow.com/questions/2784514/… – noobob Jan 23 '13 at 8:50
    
@Perception no seperate references to team objects are needed because he has reference to list object and can easily identify team object based on its name. – Subin Jan 23 '13 at 8:52
    
    
@Subin - sorry, but that's a huge assumption – Perception Jan 23 '13 at 8:53

Source : Here

You can use Collections.sort with a custom Comparator<Team>.

    class Team {
        public final int points;
        // ...
    };

    List<Team> players = // ...

    Collections.sort(players, new Comparator<Team>() {
        @Override public int compare(Team p1, Team p2) {
            return p1.points- p2.points;
        }

    });

Alternatively, you can make Team implementsComparable<Team>. This defines the natural ordering for all Team objects. Using a Comparator is more flexible in that different implementations can order by name, age, etc.

See also


For completeness, I should caution that the return o1.f - o2.f comparison-by-subtraction shortcut must be used with extreme caution due to possible overflows (read: Effective Java 2nd Edition: Item 12: Consider implementing Comparable). Presumably hockey isn't a sport where a player can score goals in the amount that would cause problems =)

See also

share|improve this answer
    
To solve the comparison problem you can just use Integer.compare() – fge Jan 23 '13 at 8:55
4  
That's basically what the OP did!? Except he did not create an anonymous class – Bastien Jansen Jan 23 '13 at 8:56
    
Right at moment i need it. +1 – Vikas Raturi Nov 19 '13 at 18:38
public class Team {
   private int points;
   private String name;

public Team(String n, int p) {
    name = n;
    points = p;
}

public int getPoints() {
    return points;
}

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<Team> lteams = new ArrayList<Team>();

    lteams.add(new Team("FC Barcelona", 0));
    lteams.add(new Team("Arsenal FC", 2));
    lteams.add(new Team("Chelsea", 3));

    Collections.sort(lteams, new MyComparator());

    for (Team lteam : lteams) {
        System.out.println(lteam.name + ": " + lteam.points + " points");
    }
}

}

class MyComparator implements Comparator<Team> {
@Override
public int compare(Team o1, Team o2) {
    if (o1.getPoints() > o2.getPoints()) {
        return -1;
    } else if (o1.getPoints() < o2.getPoints()) {
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}}

Output:
Chelsea: 3 points
Arsenal FC: 2 points
FC Barcelona: 0 points

share|improve this answer

Use this link and you will find the answer this

share|improve this answer
5  
Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. – jlordo Jan 23 '13 at 8:49

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