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I have two classes, lets call them A and B:

public class A
{
    public int foo;
    public int bar;
}

public class B
{
    public class A;
}

Now when I serialize object B the XmlSerializer is doing what you expect it to do:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<B>
    <A>
        <foo>0</foo>
        <bar>0</bar>
    </A>
</B>

But I would need the XmlSerializer to serialize the contents of class A but ignore the root <A> tag, like so:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<B>
    <foo>0</foo>
    <bar>0</bar>
</B>

I know I could just put the members of A into B but these are big classes and I would like that to be the last resort. I have tried to search MSDN/Google/the Internet but I just cant seem to get the wording right to find meaningful results so sorry if this has been asked before.

Is there any way to make the XmlSerializer not write the root tag of the class but write its members anyway? Preferably without reorganizing classes, but if there is no other way, I will do that, too.

share|improve this question
    
If you're not going to deserialize it later, how about building the object with an XDocument and then save that. Would that work? – Default Jan 23 '13 at 9:12
    
That could work, I don't know why I forgot about XDocument... I'll take a look into that. – vanneto Jan 23 '13 at 9:14
    
I wrote an answer for it. Let me know if you need more info regarding it – Default Jan 23 '13 at 9:35
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use XDocument and build the XML yourself.
Something like:

XDocument doc = new XDocument(
    new XElement("B",
        new XElement("foo", a.foo),
        new XElement("bar", a.bar)
    )
);
share|improve this answer

The XmlSerializer is not that flexible -- you can tell it to ignore a property, but then it ignores it completely.

Mind you, anything you would serialize this way would be hard if not impossible to correctly deserialize again later.

Why don't you just put foo and bar as properties of B instead?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I am aware of the problem of deserializing it later but the code just needs to produce some XML and forget about it so deserializing is not really an issue. Good point though. – vanneto Jan 23 '13 at 8:55
    
As for why I do not put foo and bar in B. That is because A is a big class and multiple classes use it, so doing that would make an even bigger mess. :D – vanneto Jan 23 '13 at 9:00

What about:

public class A
{
    public int foo;
    public int bar;
}

public class B
{
    [XmlElement(ElementName = "ABetterName")]
    public A Inner;
}

Although this is not what you're looking for it may be preferable as it allows you to give better names to the elements

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