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Let's say i have this number

int x = 65535;

Which is the decimal representation of:

ÿÿ

I know how i can do it from single char

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int f = 65535;
    printf("%c", f);
}

But this will only give me "ÿ"

I would like to do this without using any external library, and preferably using C type strings.

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6  
Let's say i have this number int x = 65535; Which is the decimal representation of: ÿÿ wat? – Eregrith Jan 23 '13 at 9:20
    
i might have explained it wrongly, ÿÿ is for 65535, as "49" is for "1". As ÿ is 255 in decimal, ÿÿ is (255*256)+255 = 65535 – Alexandru Calin Jan 23 '13 at 9:22
2  
ÿ is 255 in Latin-1 or Windows-1252. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 23 '13 at 9:23
up vote 2 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    unsigned f = 65535; // initial value

    // this will do the printf and ff >>= 8 until f <= 0 ( =0 actually)
    do {
      printf("%c", f & 0xff); // print once char. The &0xff keeps only the bits for one byte (8 bits)
      f >>= 8; // shifts f right side for 8 bits
    } while (f > 0);
}

Consider the value 65535, or 0xffff in hexadecimal, meaning its positive value takes 2 bytes that are 0xff and 0xff

  • print of f & 0xff keeps only the 8 LSb, (0xffff & 0xff = 0xff)
  • f >> = 8 shifts the value 8 bits to the right, 0xffff becomes 0x00ff (the 'ff' right side are gone
  • f > 0 is true since f == 0xff now

Next loop is the same, but f >>= 8 shifts 0x00ff to the right => 0x0000, and f is null. Thus the f > 0 condition is wrong and the loop ends.

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That will work with his specific values, but not generally. (What happens, for example, if x > 65535?) – James Kanze Jan 23 '13 at 9:23
    
Well.. i need for bigger values too, any ideas? – Alexandru Calin Jan 23 '13 at 9:25
1  
Answer rewritten (works with f = 0; as well) – ringø Jan 23 '13 at 9:27
    
Nice, can you please explain me the code? – Alexandru Calin Jan 23 '13 at 9:32
    
Answer edited . – ringø Jan 23 '13 at 9:40

What you're looking for is bit masking: (x >> 8) & 0xFF for the high order byte, and (x & 0xFF) for the lower. (Actually, if int has 32 bits, it's (x >> 24) & 0xFF for the high order byte. But given the values, and what you say your expecting, you probably want the second byte, and not the high order byte.)

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What you have is a 16 bit (two bytes) unsigned number. A char is 8 bits (one byte). This means you have to extract the two bytes in the number to get them as separate character.

This is done with the bitwise operators. You can use bitwise and & and bitwise shift >> to accomplish that.

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Something like

char buffer[9];
long value = 65535;
char *cur = buffer;
while (value > 0)
{
    *cur++ = value % 0x100;
    value /= 0x100;
}
*cur = 0;
share|improve this answer
1  
Sorry.. but what is this? Could you explain? – Krishnabhadra Jan 23 '13 at 9:24
    
I don't understand it either, but apparently it works @_@ – Alexandru Calin Jan 23 '13 at 9:27

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