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I need to add objects to a list (with List semantics) while keeping all objects in the list unique. I figured LinkedHashSet would do, but the "re-insert" clause breaks this:

LinkedHashSet<String>list = new LinkedHashSet<String>();
list.add("a");
list.add("b");
list.add("c");
list.add("a");
list.add("a");
System.out.println (list);

Output from the above is: [a, b, c], not [b, c, a] as I would like it.

Is there any such data-structure in Java which handles this case?

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3  
And what's the expected behavior? This doesn't allow duplicates. –  m0skit0 Jan 23 '13 at 9:43
1  
Why would you expect the output to be [b, c, a]? LinkedHashSet maintains the insertion order, and hence that output. –  Rohit Jain Jan 23 '13 at 9:46
    
I think the op wants last insertion order (if a key is reinserted its position should change to a new position). –  assylias Jan 23 '13 at 9:46
1  
@GanGnaMStYleOverFlowErroR TreeSet does not maintain insertion order. –  Martin Wickman Jan 23 '13 at 9:46
    
@m0skit0 Expected behavior is detailed in my question (list semantics + set uniqueness). –  Martin Wickman Jan 25 '13 at 12:12
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

try

    Set<String> set = Collections.newSetFromMap(new LinkedHashMap<String, Boolean>(16, 0.75f, true));
    set.add("a");
    set.add("b");
    set.add("c");
    set.add("a");
    set.add("a");
    System.out.println(set);

output

[b, c, a]
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It is a great idea, but worth mentioning that a get will also change the order. –  assylias Jan 23 '13 at 10:05
    
@assylias Yes, but Set has no get(), so it works. This is a very clever idea. –  Martin Wickman Jan 23 '13 at 10:08
    
@MartinWickman You are totally right - my comment makes no sense. I had given a +1 anyway. –  assylias Jan 23 '13 at 10:11
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I don't think there is an out of the box data structure that does what you want as it seems a little odd. I would suggest you create a wrapper around LinkedHashSet that pops the element when you try to re-inserts it and than inserts it again.

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1  
"create a rapper"? :) –  m0skit0 Jan 25 '13 at 14:54
    
@m0skit0 ahahah just one of those typos that make typing so much fun thank you :) –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 25 '13 at 14:54
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Actually there is out of the box data structure provided JDK libraries. If you look into next LinkedHashMap constructor:

/**
 * Constructs an empty <tt>LinkedHashMap</tt> instance with the
 * specified initial capacity, load factor and ordering mode.
 *
 * @param  initialCapacity the initial capacity
 * @param  loadFactor      the load factor
 * @param  accessOrder     the ordering mode - <tt>true</tt> for
 *         access-order, <tt>false</tt> for insertion-order
 * @throws IllegalArgumentException if the initial capacity is negative
 *         or the load factor is nonpositive
 */
public LinkedHashMap(int initialCapacity,
         float loadFactor,
                     boolean accessOrder) {
    super(initialCapacity, loadFactor);
    this.accessOrder = accessOrder;
}

there is an extra parameter accessOrder based on it newly added added object will be moved to the end of the list(accessOrder - true) or remain at old location(accessOrder - false)

In order to create Set with these characteristic you would need to use next factory method from java.util.Collections: newSetFromMap(LinkedHashMap(initialCapacity, loadFactor, accessOrder))

Keep in mind that accessOrder property responsible for all interactions with given element - if you'd call get on hasmap it will do reordering as well(that shouldn't affect you anyway because Set interface does not expose get method on wrapped hashmap, just saying)

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