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My question is how can align objects to look like this without the dots:

1234 ..................................................................................................................................................................................1234....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................1234

I know this can be done with different class and then different margin-top. But I have many objects. Is there a way to do it direct in css without javascript?

Thanks :)

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1  
I think you can do this with <ul></ul> tag but i'm not sure about what you're asking for –  Claudio Ludovico Panetta Jan 23 '13 at 9:55
    
Looks like nested uls indeed. Then you can css the bullets to not be displayed. Something in that direction possibly. –  René Wolferink Jan 23 '13 at 9:59

3 Answers 3

give float:left; or margin-left : 0px; property to all the objects.

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I want every "1234" (some object) to be on a new line and to be like a ladder –  kaioian Jan 23 '13 at 11:38

You just use the margin-left property

With the margin property you can align elements and push them from the left, right, top or bottom as you prefer.

For example :

<span style="margin-left:0px;">1234</span><br/>
<span style="margin-left:30px;">1234</span><br/>
<span style="margin-left:60px;">1234</span>

Example

If you wish to achieve your example and without <br/> then i would suggest the following.

<span style="display:block; margin-left:0px; margin-bottom:15px;">1234</span>
<span style="display:block; margin-left:30px; margin-bottom:15px;">1234</span>
<span style="display:block; margin-left:60px; margin-bottom:15px;">1234</span>

Example

With the display:block; you make a div style of attribute out of it and allows you to use margin-bottom. With the margin-bottom you push the next element down which causes a extra line in between.

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I think using spans with margin's (while converted to block-element) is great when your text is only one line. When you look at this example below (http://codepen.io/anon/pen/LKysb) you'll see that this span is acting like a text-indent naturally when using margins and it's default display: inline. Why use a inline-element element and change it to block-element while u can use a block-element instantly.

My suggestion: Use a div, and add a margin-left.

Note:

When you want to achieve this inside a paragraph <p> then you can't use div's. Because the <p> is only allowed to have inline elements. Using a <span> inside a div and transforming it in a block-element is a way to trick some validators, but I don't know how different browsers react to that.

So to get back to your question:

html:

<div class="step1">
  1234
</div>
<div class="step2">
  1234
</div>
<div class="step3">
  1234
</div>
<div class="step4">
  1234
</div>

Css:

.step1 { margin-left: 0px; }
.step2 { margin-left: 20px; }
.step3 { margin-left: 40px; }
.step4 { margin-left: 60px; }

/* Update */

a Quick way without classes and without javascript is:

html:

<div>1<div>2<div>3<div>4</div></div></div></div>

css:

div { margin-left: 20px; }

BUT If you don't want alot of classes OR vague html (like in this exmaple above), you can use jQuery to help you:

html:

<div>1</div>
<div>2</div>
<div>3</div>
<div>4</div>

jQuery:

$(function() {
  var currentOffset = 0;
  var offsetPerDiv = 10;
  $('div').each(function() {
    $(this).css('margin-left',currentOffset+'px');
    currentOffset = currentOffset+offsetPerDiv;
  }); 
}); 

See live: http://codepen.io/anon/pen/Lgzvx

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Harmen de Vries this work but when you have 400 and more objects (1234) there will be a lot of classes. Is there any easier way? –  kaioian Jan 23 '13 at 12:27
    
Yep, that would be awfull :P There is a simple fix for that. I'll edit my first post, cause comments are not good readable. –  Harmen de Vries Jan 23 '13 at 15:38

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