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How to prevent loading the value that is not present in the cache many times simultanously, in the efficient way?

A typical cache usage is the following pseudocode:

Object get(Object key) {
 Object value = cache.get(key);
 if (value == null) {
  value = loadFromService(key);
  cache.set(key,value);
 }
 return value;
}

The problem: before the value is loaded from service (Database, WebService, RemoteEJB or anything else) a second call may be made in the same time, which will make the value loaded once again.

For example, when I'm caching all items for user X, and this user is often viewed, and have many items, there's high probability of calling the load of his all items simultanously, resulting in heavy load on the server.

I could make get function synchronized, but this would force other searches to wait, making not much sense. I could create new lock for every key, but I don't know if it's a good idea to manage such large number of locks in Java (this part is language specific, the reason I've tagged it as java).

Or there is another approach I could use? If so, what would be the most efficient?

share|improve this question
1  
You're overthinking this, seriously. Unless the time to load the data from the service is horrendously long, this won't ever be a problem. –  pablochan Jan 23 '13 at 10:12
    
I have some alien EJB code which can take up to 20 seconds in test environment, so I'm afraid what would happen with 10 or 20 concurrent requests –  Р̀СТȢѸ́ФХѾЦЧШЩЪЫЬѢѤЮѦѪѨѬѠѺѮѰѲѴ Jan 23 '13 at 10:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Don't reinvent the wheel, use guava's LoadingCache or memoizing supplier.

If you are using Ehcache, read about read-through, this is the pattern you are asking for. You must implement the CacheEntryFactory interface to instruct the cache how to read objects on a cache miss, and you must wrap the Ehcache instance with an instance of SelfPopulatingCache.

share|improve this answer
    
As I understand, the CacheLoader is doing what I expect, with internal management of the synchronization that would be needed? –  Р̀СТȢѸ́ФХѾЦЧШЩЪЫЬѢѤЮѦѪѨѬѠѺѮѰѲѴ Jan 23 '13 at 10:32
    
Yes, and offers much more - eviction, removal listeners, etc. –  mindas Jan 23 '13 at 10:33
    
I see, interesting, I was using ehcache but I can consider using guava, however ehcache supports overflowing to disk, and still, the way how to implement it is itself interesting. –  Р̀СТȢѸ́ФХѾЦЧШЩЪЫЬѢѤЮѦѪѨѬѠѺѮѰѲѴ Jan 23 '13 at 10:36
    
If you are using Ehcache, read about read-through, this is the pattern you are asking for. I think Ehcache supports this, too. –  mindas Jan 23 '13 at 11:03

Something you can do generically is to use the hashCode of the Object.

You can have an array of locks which used based on the hashCode to reduce the chance of collisions. Or as a hack you can use the fact that auto-boxed bytes always return the same objects.

Object get(Object key) {
    Object value = cache.get(key);
    if (value == null) {
        // every possible Byte is cached by the JLS.
        Byte b = Byte.valueOf((byte) key.hashCode());
        synchronized (b) {
            value = cache.get(key);
            if (value == null) {
                value = loadFromService(key);
                cache.set(key, value);
            }
        }
    }
    return value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great idea with lock pooling based on hashCode! But after getting lock you can find your value cached by other process, so you should also check if it is loaded :) –  Р̀СТȢѸ́ФХѾЦЧШЩЪЫЬѢѤЮѦѪѨѬѠѺѮѰѲѴ Jan 23 '13 at 10:18
2  
Wow, I would never though of using bytes in this way! –  Petro Semeniuk Jan 23 '13 at 10:24
    
What is more, this is the first time I see the practical usage of Byte values pooling by valueOf :) –  Р̀СТȢѸ́ФХѾЦЧШЩЪЫЬѢѤЮѦѪѨѬѠѺѮѰѲѴ Jan 23 '13 at 10:26
    
Can you explain what do you mean by "every possible Byte is cached by the JLS." ? Is it like JVM from start caches them or in time they will be cached in memory possibly because of their immutableness? –  auselen Jan 23 '13 at 10:40
    
Ok, may be this answers it android.googlesource.com/platform/libcore/+/master/luni/src/… : 306 –  auselen Jan 23 '13 at 10:50

For the time of loading, insert an intermediate object in the map instead of the result to indicate that the loading started but not finished. Below java.util.concurrent.FutureTask is used for the intermediate object:

Object get(final Object key) throws Exception {
    boolean doRun = false;
    Object value;
    synchronized (cache) {
        value = cache.get(key);
        if (value == null) {
            value = new FutureTask(new Callable() {
                @Override
                public Object call() throws Exception {
                    Object loadedValue = loadFromService(key);
                    synchronized (cache) {cache.put(key, loadedValue);};
                    return loadedValue;
                }

            });
            cache.put(key, value);
            doRun=true;
        }
    }
    if (value instanceof FutureTask) {
        FutureTask task = (FutureTask) value;
        if (doRun) {
            task.run();
        }
        return task.get();
    }
    return value;
}`
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm your solution requires to always do synchronization on the whole cache, but the synchronized part is quite fast. What would you think of doing initially get, and running synchronized part only when the value is null? –  Р̀СТȢѸ́ФХѾЦЧШЩЪЫЬѢѤЮѦѪѨѬѠѺѮѰѲѴ Jan 23 '13 at 11:21
    
It depends on how many requests to the cache per second you expect. The synchronized part longs less than 1 microsecond, so if your rate is less than 100000 requests per second, the chance of collision is negligible anyway, so any complications would give no effect. If the rate is more, then there is another story, and you have to take into account many different things, including processor caching, thread switching, and garbage collector, among which access to your cache may be not in the first place from performance point of view. –  Alexei Kaigorodov Jan 23 '13 at 11:34

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