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I would like to have the opinion of other developper about the best way to organise your C++ source code.

Before, I use to place all my headers in a sinlge directory, and sources in different directories:

  • root
    • includes
    • src
      • module1
      • module2
    • ...

Each modules contains the C++ sources and the private headers (headers of class not "exposed" to other modules).

But I don't like this organization, we don't easily "see" which class is exposed by each module and to switch the include directory / source folder. In this project I had more than 200 headers files and was kind of a mess to find a specific file sometimes. Of source, most editor allow to switch header/source easilly, but I don't think it's a good practice at the end.

So I decided to change. For a new project, I switch to the other paradigm:

  • root
    • modules
      • modules1
        • include
        • sources
      • modules1
        • include
        • sources

With each sources also containing the privates headers. The "include" directory contains the "public" headers. The include line for the other module would be somethink like:

#include "modules1/include/Class.hpp"

But this organization is still not good for me. For my last project I went further and done this organization:

  • root
    • builders
    • documentation
    • modules
      • modules1
        • api
        • includes
        • sources
        • tests
      • modules1
        • api
        • includes
        • sources
        • tests

Private headers are placed in the directory "includes" of each module, and the public headers, containing only what the module is exposing to the other modules, are placed in the "api" directory. "tests" are directory when the unit test are placed. Other tests or model programs are placed in another directory. "builder" is a directory where all build scripts/Makefiles/VC++ Project/... are placed.

So to include an header one would add a line such as

#include "modules1/api/Class.hpp"

I find it quite elegant, however I'm still not satisfied. I try to rename the "include" directory to "private" or "private_headers" but I don't find these solution better than "include".

And you, what is your organisation?

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closed as not constructive by harper, rds, C. Ross, Linger, JaredMcAteer Jan 23 '13 at 14:17

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Our project uses the same folder for private-headers, implementation and tests - Only we use different extensions (hpp, cpp and cpt) –  nishantjr Jan 23 '13 at 10:15
    
I think you need a different approach. Rather than reorganizing, you need to break up your project into smaller pieces. –  William Pursell Jan 23 '13 at 12:27
    
What is the .cpt extension for? –  Gaetan Jan 23 '13 at 14:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Personally, I like to code-organisation similar to that Boost uses:

  • headers
    • module 1
    • module 2
  • sources
    • module 1
      • src
      • test
      • include
      • ...

With the headers branch containing the public interfaces. Inter-module references are just

#include "moduleX/header.hpp"

Intra-module references are just

#include "classY.hpp"

with the build-infrastructure ensuring that the compiler looks in respectively headers or headers/moduleX and sources/moduleX/include.
As the source code does not refer to the base directory structure, you should be able to easily change that.
Documentation could either be placed in a separate top-level folder, or with the module sources.

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I kind of like this organization. It seems to mix both "every public library is a separated directory" and "avoid huge list of header files" concepts in it. –  Gaetan Jan 23 '13 at 14:02

I personally would put the API headers in a common folder higher up - that saves the "non-module" components from having a long list of include directories.

Having test in its own directory is definitely a good plan.

I don't really think you can say that there is one right or wrong way to do this - it's a lot about personal preference, and how you work with things.

Although it is not the "purist" way, I would also consider not splitting into so many files. It's often possible to group classes that are used together into one file - if later on you find a particular case where something needs to be split out, you can always separate it (and include the new file into the original one, in most cases).

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We have the following source code structure:

  • Root
    • Build
    • ThirdParty
    • Sources
      • App modules
      • Dll modlues
      • Lib modules
        • module
          • C.h
          • C.cpp
          • C_gmock.h
          • CTest.cpp
          • Test
            • main.cpp (unit test runner for this lib)

We have adopted the following guidelines:

  • One class per file. Exceptions are allowed, of course.
  • Keep .h and .cpp in the same directory.
  • Keep unit tests and mocks close to the source. This practice has proved as good.
  • We do not differentiate between public and private interfaces.
  • When builing the software, unit tests are executed as post build steps after linking.

Generally, this works fine, but there are also some drawbacks. Flat library directory structure brought us some difficulties over time. Just to mention the most painful points:

  • Wild library dependencies.
  • Business code and gui code are mixed far too often.
  • Deep dependency on third party libraries, most prominently Qt. Out applications use Qt for GUI and all code depends now on Qt, which is becoming increasingly annoying.

We have started introducing structure into libraries based on Robert Martin's Clean Coders principles in order to address these issues.

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The schema I am using and recommending is:

  • root
    • build
    • install
      • module1
        • bin
        • include
        • lib
    • src
      • module1

With this, you also consider headers as source, which makes development easier in my opinion. In the installation directory, you separate binaries and includes. This makes it handy for other programs who would use your api to add these paths easily.

Example:

path-to-root/install/module1 will be the module path. You would just append include or bin or whatever other folder you have, in order to make use of the api.

You can put tests under build if they are automated, or put them in install/module1/test so the end user can also use them.

The biggest upside of this approach is that your code never gets mixed with binaries, object files, etc. And more importantly, you get a clear separation between development and release.

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