Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to find out list of revision on a branch in which a Merge was performed (This could be from any of the branches in SVN)

I have been doing a lot of search and have found ways to identify Revision which were merged and even revision which should be merged (using svn mergeinfo) but that is not what I am looking for.

I want revision in which a merge was performed on development line for which a URL is passed in as a parameter. I note that this repository makes use of mergeinfo and I only want to use that.

After hours of search I am finally giving up on this. It seems its either not possible or I am looking in the wrong direction :(

Does anyone know how to do this?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Unfortunately it is not possible out-of-the-box: Merge activities are recognizable by modification of svn:mergeinfo property.

The problem is, you can not see if a change was made in content of a file/directory or if change was made in some properties by looking into the svn log. You need to make a diff between these revisions.

A very easy workaround could be that useres performing a merge operation should add a keyword to log message(for example:MERGE). It is quite easy to check via pre-commit hook if the keyword is present in a certain log message

share|improve this answer
    
Doesnt SVN store revision in which this change was made? Not even time of the change? –  Salman A. Kagzi Jan 23 '13 at 13:37
    
Yes it stores it inside a revision, however it is not possible to find revisions which containing the change afterwards.. –  Peter Parker Jan 23 '13 at 21:50
    
Thats disappointing. :( –  Salman A. Kagzi Jan 24 '13 at 7:23
    
Are there any indirect ways of doing this? Maybe using a shell script or something. Any suggestions? –  Salman A. Kagzi Jan 25 '13 at 10:44
    
You can use "svnlook diff" but you have to parse every single revision and scan the output for changes in the property –  Peter Parker Jan 26 '13 at 22:38
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.