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I have to use BinaryResponseParser in my application.I dont know what it is the use of BinaryResponseParser. As I searched in web I got one information that "A BinaryResponseParser that sends callback events rather then build a large response"

Here what is the call back events in the response.Can any one clearly explain what is the call back event and how it was used in Solr.

If am not using BinaryResponseParser in my application means , what will be the effect ?

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If you have to use something, surely you at least know what it is for at least. Is this a school assignment or something? Have you tried looking at the source of it? You can get it from SVN, GitHub or GrepCode if you try. Then you would find out that it is part of SolrJ and you can read up on that. –  Alexandre Rafalovitch Jan 23 '13 at 12:53
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BinaryResponseParser is a parser for Solr responses serialized in a binary format as opposed to json or xml. The class has one method that can be of use to you (v. 3.6.x):

public NamedList<Object> processResponse(InputStream body, String encoding).

The advantage of using binary serialization is that your response size will be much smaller. This can be critical for the performance of live IR systems like Lucene/Solr - just imagine an auto-suggest service, which has to provide a list of suggestions for a user for every key-stroke. The response must be dellivered to the user bellow 100ms. If you don't use binary encoding, your response will be larger and consequently will take a bit longer to transfer over HTTP.

I suggest you take a look at SolrJ - a Java client for Solr that will possibly solve most of your problems.

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