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I have been experimenting with the time command(/usr/bin/time). I made the time command run as below

/usr/bin/time -v sleep 30

On the other terminal I did a ps -a and found out the PID of sleep process.Now I send a message to the sleep using kill -1 PID which terminated the process sleep.Since the sleep was running on the care of time,it listed out the resource usage statistics as below

Command being timed: "sleep 30"
User time (seconds): 0.00
System time (seconds): 0.00
Percent of CPU this job got: 0%
Elapsed (wall clock) time (h:mm:ss or m:ss): 0:21.81
Average shared text size (kbytes): 0
Average unshared data size (kbytes): 0
Average stack size (kbytes): 0
Average total size (kbytes): 0
Maximum resident set size (kbytes): 2160
Average resident set size (kbytes): 0
Major (requiring I/O) page faults: 0
Minor (reclaiming a frame) page faults: 180
Voluntary context switches: 2
Involuntary context switches: 2
Swaps: 0
File system inputs: 0
File system outputs: 0
Socket messages sent: 0
Socket messages received: 0
Signals delivered: 0
Page size (bytes): 4096
Exit status: 0

However to my surprise the Signals Delivered field has a 0! How is that possible?

EDIT:

Instead of sleep 30 ,I experimented with the following script.

trap "echo Hello" 1 2
sleep 30

Now I timed the above script and send signals 1 and 2 to it. In that case too the Signals delivered field was still 0.That makes me conclude that Signals Delivered field is 0 ,not because the signals are not handled.

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My guess is that the signal is never deliverd because the sleep process has no handler installed. Since there is a DFLT or IGN handler "set", the kernel terminates the process before delivering the signal. (delivering a signal to a process with a non-existing handler would be useless anyway.) –  wildplasser Jan 23 '13 at 12:34
    
@wildplasser I have edited the question. I have arrived at the conclusion that not handling the signal is not the reason for having a 0 value for signals delivered. –  PaulDaviesC Jan 23 '13 at 12:43

2 Answers 2

I am using this program:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <signal.h>

volatile unsigned int counter=0;

void exithandler(int signum)
{
_exit(1);
}

void ignorehandler(int signum)
{
counter += signum;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{

int delay;

signal ( SIGHUP, ignorehandler );
signal ( SIGQUIT, exithandler );
for (delay = atoi(argv[1] ); delay > 0; ) {
        delay = sleep( delay);
        }

printf("Counter=%u\n", counter);
return 0;
}

, and I get similar results (after 11 SIGHUPS, obviously):

Plasser@pisbak>$ Counter=11
Command being timed: "./mysleep 20"
User time (seconds): 0.00
System time (seconds): 0.00
Percent of CPU this job got: 0%
Elapsed (wall clock) time (h:mm:ss or m:ss): 0:22.56
Average shared text size (kbytes): 0
Average unshared data size (kbytes): 0
Average stack size (kbytes): 0
Average total size (kbytes): 0
Maximum resident set size (kbytes): 1856
Average resident set size (kbytes): 0
Major (requiring I/O) page faults: 0
Minor (reclaiming a frame) page faults: 163
Voluntary context switches: 13
Involuntary context switches: 1
Swaps: 0
File system inputs: 0
File system outputs: 0
Socket messages sent: 0
Socket messages received: 0
Signals delivered: 0
Page size (bytes): 4096
Exit status: 0
[1]+  Done                    /usr/bin/time -v ./mysleep 20
Plasser@pisbak>$ man getrusage
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I am asking the reason for it! –  PaulDaviesC Jan 23 '13 at 13:06
1  
I know that. I just want to avoid that you (or others) have to retype the same thing. BTW: even after adding a getrusage() to the above program, the .ru_nsignals is still zero. –  wildplasser Jan 23 '13 at 13:12
up vote 0 down vote accepted

time makes use of wait4 system call.I discovered one thing that some fields of struct rusage are remaining unmaintained. ru_nsignals is one such field in the struct rusage. For details refer the right answer to this question

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