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I have a quite messy legacy database design, which I can't change due the current state of the data. I would like to "emulate" in some way a relationship with the Entity Framework which is not defined in the database, specially for being able to take advantage of the lazy loading which is working nicely in other areas of the application.

The structure is similar to:

class Father {
    [Key]
    public int Id {get;set;} 
    public string someIdentifier {get;set;}
}

class Kid {
    [Key]
    public int Id {get;set;}
    public string SomeIdentifier {get;set;}
    public string Name {get;set;}
}

A father can have multiple rows of 'Kid', and the relationship must be stablished with the someIdentifier string. Also, Kids can have multiple rows of fathers as well. This relationship is not expressed in the database, and that's why I talking about 'emulation'. I don't know if it's possible to have some Father/Kid class like:

class Father {
    [Key]
    public int Id {get;set;} 
    public string someIdentifier {get;set;}
    public virtual<Kid> Kids {get;set;}
}

class Kid {
    [Key]
    public int Id {get;set;}
    public string SomeIdentifier {get;set;}
    public string Name {get;set;}
    public virtual<Father> Fathers {get;set;}
}

Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
    
"Kids can have multiple rows of fathers as well" +1 –  daryal Jan 23 '13 at 12:29
1  
'This relationship is not expressed in the database', how does the application work at all then?? –  Justin Harvey Jan 23 '13 at 12:31
    
The application "manually" loads all records of Kids that have SomeIdentifier equals to SomeValue. I'm wondering if EF can do this automatically for me :). Was It well explained enough? Thanks a lot! –  IoChaos Jan 23 '13 at 12:37

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