Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My question is actually fairly simple, how do I make a create action which checks if a user is logged in, and if she/he is then redirect to the dashboard instead of rendering the index page where they've got links and stuff to go to and sign up. Also why is the code below not working.

class UsersController < ApplicationController

def new
  @user = User.new
end

def create
  if current_user.nil?
    redirect_to dplace_index_path
  if current_user
        @user = User.new(params[:user])
      if @user.save
          auto_login(@user)
          redirect_to dplace_index_path
  end
end
end
end
end
share|improve this question
    
what's the error you are getting ? –  My God Jan 23 '13 at 12:28

4 Answers 4

Your code isn't doing what you expect because the if statements are actually nested (you want elsif with this same structure -- or see my suggested fix below). Here's what your code, when properly formatted, actually looks like:

def create
  if current_user.nil?
    redirect_to dplace_index_path
    if current_user
      @user = User.new(params[:user])
      if @user.save
        auto_login(@user)
        redirect_to dplace_index_path
      end
    end
  end
end

Logically, you will never get down into the second if statement, because current_user must be nil to enter the first. Try something like this instead:

def create
  if current_user
    @user = User.new(params[:user])
    if @user.save
      auto_login(@user)
      redirect_to dplace_index_path
    end
  else
    redirect_to dplace_index_path
  end
end

I rearranged the code, but it should logically do what you want now. I put the "happy path" first (the current_user exists), and moved the redirect into the else statement.

share|improve this answer
    
In that case "current_user" must be true, I don't want that either. So "elsif" is a preferred and good way? –  MrBobMcQlurk Jan 23 '13 at 13:35
    
current_user doesn't have to be true -- it just has to be "truthy". When current_user is set to a user object, it will evaluate to true with the if current_user condition. When current_user is nil (which is what you were checking for originally), if current_user will evaluate to false and fall through to the else statement. There's nothing wrong with using an elsif in your code, but in this instance it's not necessary. Make sense? –  Cade Jan 23 '13 at 20:08

General user authentication:

 def create
      user = User.find_by_email(params[:email])
      if user && user.authenticate(params[:password])
        session[:user_id] = user.id
        redirect_to dashboard_url, :notice => "Logged in!"
      else
        flash.now.alert = "Invalid email or password"
        render "new"
      end
    end
share|improve this answer
    
I kinda think that the answers above very a little more easy and simplified. Thanks anyway though :) –  MrBobMcQlurk Jan 23 '13 at 13:42
    
Glad to know :) –  My God Jan 23 '13 at 13:46

Try:

def create
  if current_user.blank? # .blank? will check both blank and nil
    # logic when user is not logged in
    redirect_to index_path
  else 
    # logic when user is logged in
    redirect_to dashboard_path
  end
end
share|improve this answer
def create
  redirect_to dplace_index_path unless current_user
  # no need to check current_user again
  @user = User.new(params[:user])
  if @user.save
    auto_login(@user)
    redirect_to dplace_index_path
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Really?! I kinda felt that not specifying that could lead to some kind of exploit by others, like hackers and such? You sure? –  MrBobMcQlurk Jan 23 '13 at 13:42
    
Can I add this to the new action instead of the create action. Could that lead to some kind of exploit possibilities? –  MrBobMcQlurk Jan 23 '13 at 14:38
    
That code will indeed continue to execute the remainder of the action even if there is no current_user –  Frederick Cheung Jan 23 '13 at 15:36
    
@FrederickCheung is right. Don't do this. Rails will execute the entire method and buffer the output before executing redirect_to. redirect_to is not the same as a method return. At the very least, you'll need to write redirect_to dplace_index_path and return unless current_user. –  Cade Jan 23 '13 at 20:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.