Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to get the starting position of the 2nd occurrence of ABC. With something like this:

var string = "XYZ 123 ABC 456 ABC 789 ABC";
getPosition(string, 'ABC', 2) // --> 16

How would you do it?

share|improve this question
    
The second occurrence or the last? :) –  Ja͢ck Jan 23 '13 at 13:01
    
Sorry for confusion I'm not looking for the last index. I'm looking for the starting position of nth occurrence, in this case the second. –  Ádám Jan 23 '13 at 13:02
    
Why do you need it? What do you want to do with the index? Chances are there's an easier approach than finding the index and going on from there. This sounds like a XY Problem. –  Joachim Sauer Dec 16 '13 at 14:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I would use

function getPosition(str, m, i) {
   return str.split(m, i).join(m).length;
}
share|improve this answer
    
awesome this works, thanks very much!! –  Ádám Jan 23 '13 at 13:08
1  
... nice one :-) –  jAndy Jan 23 '13 at 13:15
2  
I actually don't like this answer. Given an unbounded length input, it needlessly creates an unbounded length array, and then throws most of it away. It would be faster and more efficient just to iteratively use the fromIndex argument to String.indexOf –  Alnitak Jan 23 '13 at 13:31
    
If performances matter a lot, then you could iterate and add the lengths after slicing instead of joining. In some cases, depending on the application real data, you might even cache the array. But none of those optimizations has any weight comparing to the maintainability gain of a non verbose function if you don't measure performances and if there is no performance problem... –  dystroy Jan 23 '13 at 13:38
1  
function getPosition(str, m, i) { return str.split(m, i).join(m).length; } –  copy Jan 23 '13 at 13:42

Because recursion is always the answer.

function getPosition(input, search, nth, curr, cnt) {
    curr = curr || 0;
    cnt = cnt || 0;
    var index = input.indexOf(search);
    if (curr === nth) {
        if (~index) {
            return cnt;
        }
        else {
            return -1;
        }
    }
    else {
        if (~index) {
            return getPosition(input.slice(index + search.length),
              search,
              nth,
              ++curr,
              cnt + index + search.length);
        }
        else {
            return -1;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can also use the string indexOf without creating any arrays.

The second parameter is the index to start looking for the next match.

function nthIndex(str, pat, n){
    var L= str.length, i= -1;
    while(n-- && i++<L){
        i= str.indexOf(pat, i);
    }
    return i;
}

var s= "XYZ 123 ABC 456 ABC 789 ABC";

nthIndex(s,'ABC',3)

/* returned value: (Number) 24 */

share|improve this answer

Working off of kennebec's answer, I created a prototype function which will return -1 if the nth occurence is not found rather than 0.

String.prototype.nthIndexOf = function(pattern, n) {
    var i = -1;

    while (n-- && i++ < this.length) {
        i = this.indexOf(pattern, i);
        if (i < 0) break;
    }

    return i;
}
share|improve this answer

Here's my solution, which just iterates over the string until n matches have been found:

String.prototype.nthIndexOf = function(searchElement, n, fromElement) {
    n = n || 0;
    fromElement = fromElement || 0;
    while (n > 0) {
        fromElement = this.indexOf(searchElement, fromElement);
        if (fromElement < 0) {
            return -1;
        }
        --n;
        ++fromElement;
    }
    return fromElement - 1;
};

var string = "XYZ 123 ABC 456 ABC 789 ABC";
console.log(string.nthIndexOf('ABC', 2));

>> 16
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.