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I'm simply trying to get a percentage.

irb(main):001:0> (25 / 50) * 100
=> 0

This should most definitely equal 50, as confirmed by my calculator (copied and pasted the same equation into gcalc). Why does Ruby refuse to do this?

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By the way, if division were actually broken in Ruby, do you really think you would be the first person to notice it? It always amazes me how people see an unexpected behavior and always assume it is the fault of the language, the library, the environment, etc., and never the fault of their own code... –  Daniel Pryden Sep 19 '09 at 7:34
    
@Daniel: Not just Ruby, any language... –  gbn Sep 19 '09 at 9:03
    
Most languages work like this, javascript being a notable exception. Actually Ruby is extra-cool, automatically shifting from Fixnum to Bignum when you need more precision. (BTW, who else does that? There must be some lang that does it...) –  DigitalRoss Sep 19 '09 at 9:20
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I never said it was "broken", I said Ruby was refusing to divide "correctly". Which, apparently, Ruby was refusing to divide /in/correctly =p –  RyanScottLewis Sep 19 '09 at 23:57
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2 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

It's doing integer division.

Basically, 25 is an integer (a whole number) and so is 50, so when you divide one by the other, it gives you another integer.

25 / 50 * 100 = 0.5 * 100 = 0 * 100 = 0

The better way to do it is to first multiply, then divide.

25 * 100 / 50 = 2500 / 50 = 50

You can also use floating point arithmetic explicitly by specifying a decimal point as in:

25.0 / 50.0 * 100 = 0.5 * 100 = 50
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Thanks guys! I was calculating the percentage completed of opening a file in open-uri. Here's what I used: percent = (file_downloaded.to_f/file_length.to_f) * 100 –  RyanScottLewis Sep 19 '09 at 7:41
    
Use the second form then. It's easier than trying to convert to floating point numbers. –  Matthew Scharley Sep 19 '09 at 8:02
    
Or rather, the first solution. The multiply then divide one. You know what I mean. –  Matthew Scharley Sep 19 '09 at 8:04
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Because you're dividing an integer by an integer, so the result is getting truncated to integer (0.5 -> 0) before getting multiplied by 100.

But this works:

>> (25 / 50) * 100
=> 0
>> (25.0 / 50) * 100
=> 50.0
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