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I'm writing a function for my homework which is supposed to tell if a given string is a palindrome or not. Although I even tried it on paper with the word "otto", my program always returns 1. Although this is a quite common question, I'd really like to know what I'm doing wrong instead of just copying a solution from here.

int is_palindrom(const char* palin)
{
    int size = strlen(palin), i=0;
    for (i=0;i<=(size/2); ++i)
    {
        if(palin[i] != palin[(size - i -1)])
        {
            return 1;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}   
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Have you inserted some printf statements to find out what values you're generating when? –  Hot Licks Jan 23 '13 at 13:11
1  
Your code looks reasonable and works for me. Can you provide an example of an input string that returns the wrong value? –  simonc Jan 23 '13 at 13:12
    
Seems OK for me. Maybe you're calling it in a wrong way, or printing something bad. –  Maroun Maroun Jan 23 '13 at 13:13
3  
(Make sure that there are no extra "whitespace" characters attached to your string.) –  Hot Licks Jan 23 '13 at 13:13
    
Works for me as well. Are you sure you're checking your assumptions correctly? For example, if you use your is_palindrom function as a condition for an if, it will look like it returned the opposite result because 1 is the convention for true in C and 0 is for false, while you're using them here in the opposite way. –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Jan 23 '13 at 13:14

4 Answers 4

Your code is correct, however please note that you may have an inverted logical expression. You are returning 1 in case of not equal, and 0 when it is. This means your function is working the opposite of "standard" C functions, where 1 evaluates to true.

Obviously, you are free to use whichever value you like to represent whatever you want. However, this can easily lead to confusion if someone else is reading your code. If bool is available, you should be using that; otherwise, you should always assume 1 is true and 0 is false.

Also, make sure to note is_palindrome takes a string and not an integer.

i.e. you must call it as is_palindrome("767") and not is_palindrome(767)

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Agreed, but it's worth noting that the return value from main() is normally 0 for success, and a non-zero value for failure, which is confusingly different from the convention you describe. –  Graham Borland Jan 23 '13 at 13:48
    
@Graham that is an exit code, the reason 0 is success is because there is usually one kind of success and an infinite kind of errors (access denied, wrong path, timeout, connection failure, etc. etc.). Exit codes are very different from function return values. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jan 23 '13 at 14:38
    
The other difference here is that main()'s name doesn't imply that it's going to return a boolean, while is_palindrome() does. –  Score_Under Jan 23 '13 at 16:01

Your code does return 0 when it should. I am guessing when you read the string you pass as argument to your function, there are extra characters appended to the string, most probably a new line character. Try debugging the application or adding debug output in the function. For instance print the length of the string and the ascii codes of the characters in it.

Here is the code I used to verify it:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
int is_palindrom(const char* palin)
{
  int size = strlen(palin), i=0;
  for (i=0;i<=(size/2); ++i)
  {
    if(palin[i] != palin[(size - i -1)])
    {
      return 1;
    }
  }
  return 0;
} 

int main(void) {
  printf("%d", is_palindrom("otto"));
  return 0;
}
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Thanks! I guess thats the problem, I was already wondering why my printf() in main() always produced an output containing a newline after the word in question, although the printf() lacked a "\n". But how do I strip the string I read with fgets() of the unwanted newline? Edit: Subtracting 2 instead on 1 did the trick, thanks a lot everybody. –  PeterPanter Jan 23 '13 at 14:05

Make sure your (const char *) has a "\0" at the end when you call this function.

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#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

int is_palindrom(const char* jj);

int main(char *args){

         int rr =   is_palindrom("otto");
         printf("rsult is %d", rr);
         getch();

}

int is_palindrom(const char* palin) 
    { 
        int size = strlen(palin), i=0; 
        for (i=0;i<=(size/2); ++i) 
        { 
            if(palin[i] != palin[(size - i -1)]) 
            { 
                return 1; 
            } 
        } 
        return 0; 
    }

I ran you code using above code snippet and it work fine for me.it returns 0 if palindrome is entered and 1 if entered value is not palindrome. the main part of the function is the loop for (i=0;i<=(size/2); ++i) and the comparison if(palin[i] != palin[(size - i -1)]) the loop starts from 0 and then in condition palin[0] element and palin[4-0-1] i.e palin[3] element first o and last o in this case are mapped then the increement ++i takes place and then nest mapping of palin[second] and palin[second-last] elements happen so you can you either `++i' or 'i++'

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