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I want to have the same static variable with a different value depending on the type of class.

So I would have

public class Entity
{
     public static Bitmap sprite;

     public void draw(Canvas canvas, int x, int y)
     {
          canvas.drawBitmap(sprite, x, y, null);
     }
}

public class Marine extends Entity
{

}

public class Genestealer extends Entity
{

}

And then in my main program go:

Marine.sprite = // Load sprite for all instances of Marine
Genestealer.sprite = // Load sprite for all instances of Genestealer

I don't want to store the same sprite in every instance of the class. I want one for each type of class. I want to inherit the static sprite variable and the draw function which will draw the sprite. But I don't want the Genstealer sprite to override the Marine sprite.

Is this possible?

How would I do it?

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and even your gravatar is a tux penguin in space marine armor - awesome :) –  weiji Sep 19 '09 at 8:11
    
I suppose you could also define it in the parent class with a "throw new UnsupportedOperationException" if you had certain children classes never expected to have a sprite (though this would also mean you lose compile time checks). –  rogerdpack Jun 1 '11 at 11:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Use an abstract method:

public class Entity
{
     public abstract Bitmap getSprite();

     public void draw(Canvas canvas, int x, int y)
     {
          canvas.drawBitmap(getSprite(), x, y, null);
     }
}

public class Marine extends Entity
{
    public Bitmap getSprite() {
        return /*the sprite*/;
    }
}

The sprite returned by getSprite can be a static if you like. Nice things about this approach:

  • You can't (easily) forget to include a sprite in your subclass, since the compiler will complain if you don't implement the abstract method.

  • It's flexible. Suppose a Marine should look different once he "levels up". Just change Marine's getSprite method to take the level into account.

  • It's the standard OO-idiom for this sort of thing, so people looking at their code won't be left scratching their heads.

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So make one Sprite and give everyone instance variables. They are just references; hardly more than pointers.

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A quick test will show you that, yes, you can override static variables in subclasses.

I have put together a simple inheritance structure to test this. StaticTest is the super of StaticTestSub. They both declare static ints TEST1, TEST2, and TEST3 with varying degrees of access. To simplify the example, I left out the private version.

public class StaticTest {
    public static int TEST1 = 1;
    protected static int TEST2 = 1;
    static int TEST3 = 1;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
            System.out.println("StaticTest.TEST1: " + StaticTest.TEST1);
            System.out.println("StaticTest.TEST2: " + StaticTest.TEST2);
            System.out.println("StaticTest.TEST3: " + StaticTest.TEST3);
            System.out.println("StaticTestSub.TEST1: " + StaticTestSub.TEST1);
            System.out.println("StaticTestSub.TEST2: " + StaticTestSub.TEST2);
            System.out.println("StaticTestSub.TEST3: " + StaticTestSub.TEST3);
    }
}


public class StaticTestSub extends StaticTest {
    public static int TEST1 = 2;
    protected static int TEST2 = 2;
    static int TEST3 = 2;
}

You can try this at home. The out put was:

StaticTest.TEST1: 1
StaticTest.TEST2: 1
StaticTest.TEST3: 1
StaticTestSub.TEST1: 2
StaticTestSub.TEST2: 2
StaticTestSub.TEST3: 2

For your specific needs, however, I recommend the approach taken by Laurence Gonsalves

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2  
Not override, but hide. –  Vlad Gudim Oct 6 '09 at 9:23

It's not possible for it to be static in the super class. That static variable in the super class is shared (effectively a singleton) by all the sub classes. Anytime you change that (say, by instantiating a sub class), that change is reflected in all the other sub class instances.

Instead, make the sprite static in the subclasses, and then use the method structure described by Laurence.

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