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Possible Duplicate:
Why provide multiple drawables for various densities?

Lets say I have a splash screen which is scaled in a way to always fit the full screen. Does it make sense to package 4 different density version of the same image? Why not let android handle the down-scaling?

Another example would be button icons. Why not packaging only xhdpi and let android do the work? Is it a memory issue?

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marked as duplicate by Veger, Reno, CoolBeans, brenjt, unholysampler Jan 23 '13 at 19:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Does it make sense to package 4 different density version of the same image? Why not let android handle the downscaling?

That depends on whether you like the results of the downscaling. If you do, use it. If you don't, supply other artwork for the densities that need it.

Is it a memory issue?

Partly, it is a speed issue, as downsampling takes CPU time (and, hence, a bit more battery).

Partly, it is a quality issue, as the downsampling that Android does means you are not in final control over what the image looks like. You might be happy with the downsampling of your images; other developers may not be happy with the downsampling of their images.

For example, the Nexus 7 is a -tvdpi device. However, Google doesn't bother with -tvdpi images -- they let Android downsample the -xhdpi images. The images seem perfectly reasonable to me, and apparently to Google as well. OTOH, Google does ship -mdpi images, not only for -mdpi devices, but to serve as the basis for downsampling for -ldpi.

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But is it a memory issue? What I mean is: does android downscale the image, and read the downscaled version into RAM before drawing it to the screen, or does android downscale the image, and keep the original hi-res version in RAM? – stoefln Jan 23 '13 at 15:13
    
@stoefin: I have no idea. You are welcome to run some tests and use MAT to try to determine this. – CommonsWare Jan 23 '13 at 15:23

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