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I have been rewriting some of my functions to return int instead of structs so that I can do this

if ( function(&struct1,vars) != 0 ) 
 { 
  // die and give error 
 }

instead of:

struct = function(vars);

I am however missing some concept here as whenever i try to access a value of my struct in the main, I do not get the value that was assigned to it in the function. I would greatly appreciate if someone could explain to me what exactly happens (I will write what I think that happens) to my memory/variables and why it doesn't work.

Main (shortened):

int  main (int argc, char *argv[]) {   
  arguments args;   
  data data;  
  scan scans;   
  printf("Value at start %i\n",scans.number);
  if (scan_extractor(&args,&scans) != 0) // Pass the reference of the struct to scan_extractor (while still being un-initilizaed, something I don't quite grasp).
   {
     printf("Error in argument reader\n");
     exit(0);
   } else { 
     printf("Main thinks %i scans\n",scans.number); 
   } 
  return(0); 
}

function (scan_extractor):

int
scan_extractor(arguments* args, scan* scans)
{
  FILE* fr;
  int counter = 0;
  fr = fopen(args->scans,"r");
  scans = calloc(MAX,sizeof(scan)); // Allocate memory to store multiple instances of the scan object
  while (fgets(mzML_buffer,MAX_BUFFER,fr) != NULL)
   {
    (scans+counter)->id = atoi(mzML_buffer); // Modify the global version of scans
    counter++;
   }
  scans->number = counter;
  printf("Function read %i scans\n",scans->number);
  return(0);
}

The file that is read contains 1 line containing the value 1

The output that i get is:

Value at start 32767
Function read 1 scans
Main thinks 32767 scans

Why this drives me crazy is that a near identical chunk of code that contains the input parameters is accessible from main using similar syntax (only char* value of struct arguments vs int value of struct scans).

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
scan_extractor(arguments* args, scan* scans)
scans = calloc(MAX,sizeof(scan));

You are allocating memory to the copy of the pointer being passed. To be able to allocate memory to a pointer inside the function. You need to pass the pointer by reference:

scan_extractor(arguments* args, scan** scans)
*scans = calloc(MAX,sizeof(scan));

On second thoughts. Your program doesn't make sense. You are mixing two concepts.
You allocate a scan object on local storage and pass its address to the function. While inside the function you allocate dynamic memory to the function local to the pointer, which was previously pointing to the object passed. This simply leaks memory while Your stack based scan object never gets populate

Basically, You only need to pass the address of object and use that object. It is already allocated no need for allocations inside the functions.

scan scans; 
if (scan_extractor(&args,&scans)

scan_extractor(arguments* args, scan* scans)
scans->number = counter;
share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking about the allocation as well but if I do not somehow state the size of memory where scans can be stored it will only make room for 1 scan, correct? –  Bas Jansen Jan 23 '13 at 14:37
    
@BasJansen: scan scans; reserves space for one scan object only. You need multiple objects, You will need to use a array. For ex: for 10 objects you need scan scans[10];. If you cannot know of how many objects you need at compile time you need to use the dynamic memory approach. –  Alok Save Jan 23 '13 at 14:40
    
Exactly, I am intending to store an unknown amount of scans in this structure that is why I was attempting to allocate memory to it, inside the function. I did also try the scan scans[MAX]; option but I got lost in the subsequent declarations of scans. –  Bas Jansen Jan 23 '13 at 14:42
    
@BasJansen What about a linked list structure then, allocating element by element in the function? –  junix Jan 23 '13 at 14:44
    
@BasJansen: Well then declare a pointer and pass it by reference to the function. scan *ptr; if (scan_extractor(&args,&ptr) –  Alok Save Jan 23 '13 at 14:44

You need a second level of indirection in order to return an allocated unit. The function scan_extractor should look like:

int scan_extractor(arguments* args, scan** scans)
{
  FILE* fr;
  int counter = 0;
  fr= fopen(args->scans,"r");
  *scans = calloc(MAX,sizeof(scan));
  while (fgets(mzML_buffer,MAX_BUFFER,fr) != NULL)
   {
    ((*scans)[counter]).id = atoi(mzML_buffer); // Modify the global version of scans
    counter++;
   }
  (*scans)->number = counter;
  printf("Function read %i scans\n",(*scans)->number);
  return(0);
}

Looking at this code somehow tells me that the lines (*scans)->number = counter; and printf("Function read %i scans\n",(*scans)->number); are wrong anyway but I can't tell this without known the scan structure. I think I can guess the intention (storing the number of scans). I recommend to solve this differently by a slightly modified approach:

typedef struct scanlist {
    unsigned int count;
    scan *scans;
}scanlist;

...

int scan_extractor(arguments* args, scanlist* scans)
{
  scans->scans = calloc(MAX,sizeof(scan));
  ...
  while (...) {
    scans->scans[counter].id = ...
  }
  ...
  scans->count = counter;

Otherwise you are wasting memory with a number field not needed for every scan.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point about the memory –  Bas Jansen Jan 23 '13 at 14:53
    
I forgot to mention that of course you should provide a "scan_cleanup" function in your module that can free the memory allocated by the extractor... I'd expect a prototype like void scan_free(scanlist *list); –  junix Jan 23 '13 at 14:58
    
((*scans)[counter])->id should be ((*scans)[counter]).id however with this notation as far as I can tell, right? –  Bas Jansen Jan 23 '13 at 15:01
    
@BasJansen Yes, you are right. Was a typo. Corrected it. Sorry. Anyway I would recommend the second approach I described. –  junix Jan 23 '13 at 15:03
    
No worries, just figured I’d point it out so that the snippet can be useful as a nice example –  Bas Jansen Jan 23 '13 at 15:04

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