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How would this code be translated into C#, specifically how would sprintf be implemented in C#?

string output = "The user %s logged in";
string loggedIn = "is";
string loggedOut = "isn't";

if (TheUser.CheckStatus())
{
    output = sprintf(output, loggedIn);
}
else
{
    output = sprintf(output, loggedOut);
}

return output;

I'm expecting to see "The user isn't logged in" if TheUser.CheckStatus() is false.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your code "ported" to C#:

        string output = "The user {0} logged in";
        string loggedIn = "is";
        string loggedOut = "isn't";

        if (TheUser.CheckStatus())
        {
            output = string.Format(output, loggedIn);
        }
        else
        {
            output = string.Format(output, loggedOut);
        }

        return output;

See here for more information on string.Format.

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Thanks for the ref! –  Jimmyt1988 Jan 23 '13 at 14:48

The whole printf family of functions in C is replaced by String.Format. The same interface is also exposed in for example Console.WriteLine().

 string output = "The user {0} logged in";
 string loggedIn = "is";
 string loggedOut = "isn't";


 output = string.Format(output, loggedIn);
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string.Format to the rescue

string output = "The user {0} logged in";
string loggedIn = "is";
string loggedOut = "isn't";

output = (TheUser.CheckStatus() ? string.Format(output, loggedIn) : 
                                  string.Format(output, loggedOut));
return output;

See also this very fundamental article on composite formatting

EDIT: shorter

return string.Format(output, (TheUser.CheckStatus() ? loggedIn : loggedOut));
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sprintf... obey me or i'll put you on diaper detail!! –  Jimmyt1988 Jan 23 '13 at 14:46
    
Your () are unbalanced. –  Henk Holterman Jan 23 '13 at 14:51
    
@HenkHolterman thanks –  Steve Jan 23 '13 at 14:52
    
Love the shorthand if statement. Thanks for that syntax too :) –  Jimmyt1988 Jan 23 '13 at 15:05
    
@JamesT yes very useful, made shorter –  Steve Jan 23 '13 at 15:45

If you want to stick with %s,%d....

string sprintf(string input,params object[] inpVars)
{
    int i=0;
    input=Regex.Replace(input,"%.",m=>("{"+ ++i +"}"));
    return string.Format(input,inpVars);
}

You can now do

sprintf("hello %s..Hi %d","foofoo",455);
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Thanks for the alternative. Good to know! –  Jimmyt1988 Jan 23 '13 at 14:54

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