Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Matrix class and it has overloaded * operators for scalar and matrix multiplications.

template <class T> class Matrix
{
    public:
        // ...
        Matrix operator*(T scalar) const;
        // ...
}

// ...

template <class T>
Matrix<T> Matrix<T>::operator*(T RightScalar) const
{
    Matrix<T> ResultMatrix(m_unRowSize, m_unColSize);
    for (uint64_t i=0; i<m_unRowSize; i++)
    {
        for (uint64_t j=0; j<m_unColSize; j++)
        {
            ResultMatrix(i, j) = TheMatrix[m_unColSize * i + j] * RightScalar;
        }
    }
    return ResultMatrix;
}

// ...

I can multiply a matrix object with a scalar from right side without any problem:

Matrix<double> X(3, 3, /* ... */);  // Define a 3x3 matrix and initialize its contents
Matrix<double> Y;                   // Define an output matrix
Y = X * 10.0;                       // Do the linear operation

But, how do I multiply it from left side same way?

Matrix<double> X(3, 3, /* ... */);
Matrix<double> Y;
Y = 10.0 * X;

In arithmetic, it is a common notation to write constants on the left side when doing multiplication. I would like to obey this rule to make my code more readable.

Is it possible to implement this in C++?
If it is possible, how do I modify the class method in my code?

share|improve this question
2  
It is possible, but not with a class method. –  Kimi Jan 23 '13 at 14:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Member functions are matched by their left-hand-side argument which is the this-pointer. Since native types can't have member functions, you have to add right-multiplication with user-defined types through non-member functions (and also for other types you don't have write-access to).

template<typename T>
Matrix<T> operator*(T const& scalar, Matrix<T> rhs)
{
    // scalar multiplication is commutative: s M = M s
    return rhs *= scalar; // calls rhs.operator*=(scalar);
}

NOTE: I wrote the above non-member operator* implemented in terms of a member operator*=. It is recommended to write all multiplications as non-member functions, and use a member operator*= to implement these multiplications with a lhs Matrix element.

This will a) keep the class interface minimal, and b) prevent hidden conversions. E.g. you could have a Matrix class that is implicitly convertible to scalar if the dimensions are 1x1, and these conversions could silently happen if you don't provide a separate overload that is a direct match.

template<typename T>
Matrix<T> operator*(Matrix<T> lhs, T const& scalar)
{
    return lhs *= scalar; // calls lhs.operator*=(scalar);
}

template<typename T>
Matrix<T> operator*(Matrix<T> lhs, Matrix<T> const& rhs)
{
    return lhs *= rhs; // calls lhs.operator*=(rhs);
}

Notice on how the lhs Matrix is a copy and not a reference. This allows the compiler to make optimizations such as copy elision / move semantics. Also note that the return type of these operators is Matrix<T> and not const Matrix<T> which was recommended in some old C++ books, but which prevents move semantics in C++11.

// class member 
template<typename T>
Matrix<T>& Matrix<T>::operator*=(Matrix<T> const& rhs)
{
    // your implementation
    return *this;
}

// class member 
template<typename T>
Matrix<T>& Matrix<T>::operator*=(T const& scalar)
{
    // your implementation
    return *this;
}
share|improve this answer

You'll need a non-member function for that:

template <typename T>
Matrix<T> operator*(T scalar, Matrix<T> const & matrix) {
    return matrix * scalar;
}

Non-member operator overloads allow you to specify any type on either side, while member overloads always get the object on the left-hand side.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.