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How does one catch I/O exceptions on windows phone 8, c++/cx?

EDIT: Here's a full example

Checking to see if a file "hello.txt" exist:

StorageFile^ Testme(String^ fileName)
{
    StorageFolder^ item =  ApplicationData::Current->LocalFolder; 
    try
    { 
        task<StorageFile^> getFileTask(item->GetFileAsync("hello.txt")); 
        getFileTask.then([](StorageFile^ storageFile)
        { 
           return storageFile;
         }); 
     }
     catch (Exception^ ex)
     {
        OutputDebugString(L"Caught the exception");
     }
     return nullptr;
}

If "hello.txt" exsit, method Testme returns the file ptr like a charm.
If "hello.txt does not exist, not only does it not throw exception FileNOtFound, instead I go crashing with this showing up in the debugger window:

Unhandled exception at 0x71D49C01 (Msvcr110d.dll) in MyPhoneApp.exe: An invalid parameter was passed to a function that considers invalid parameters fatal. If there is a handler for this exception, the program may be safely continued

What's wrong and how would I elegantly check if a file exist's or not in WP8?

I really hope someone answers ... Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
could you try to catch a general type of exception, i.e. catch(Exception e) instead of name the exceptions explicitly? –  ss1271 Jan 23 '13 at 14:54
    
Isn't the problem that the exception occurs asynchronously and you're not checking the result of your async operation? –  Paul Annetts Jan 23 '13 at 14:56
1  
1. Platform::Exception is the most general exception I could find. 2. Sorry, I should have added that I think I ruled out async issues. The code is wrapped in a create_task with a then. The exception is thrown when it should be, when the task completes. Problem is I can't catch it. –  Tinkerbell Jan 23 '13 at 15:07
1  
Are you using task-based continuations or value-based continuations? We need to see the code of GetFileAsyn to help you further. Reading this article may help: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/hh781020.aspx (specifically the section on error handling). –  Andy Rich Jan 23 '13 at 18:11
1  
I edited the example with the full async handling. –  Tinkerbell Jan 24 '13 at 18:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

After spending hours to figure out what the problem was in a related issue, I finally figured it out. Using C++, it looks Visual Studio behaves a little interesting. Instead of passing the exception to the user, it just throws it. That means even if you had a handler for the exception, your handler was not allowed to handle it. I should note here that this only happens when you run your App inside Visual Studio. Deploying and launching app shows no problem.

So to resolve it, open the exceptions settings (from Menu > Debug > Exceptions - or Ctrl+D, E). Enlarge "C++ Exceptions" and deselect "Platform::InvalidArgumentException" in "Thrown" column. Then you should be good to go.

Update after first comment:

First of all, I had to deselect COMException from the list too for below example to work.

In addition to doing above. It is important to understand async programming in C++/CX. You can not simply return from the function after creating the task. If you really need to return you need to return the worker task you created to do the job. Below is a Windows Store app sample (not WP) but they should work the same. Your helper function must be like below.

concurrency::task<bool> TestFileExists::MainPage::Testme(String^ fileName)
{
    using namespace Windows::Storage;
    using namespace concurrency;

    StorageFolder^ item =  ApplicationData::Current->LocalFolder; 

    return create_task(item->GetFileAsync(fileName)).then([this](task<StorageFile^> t)
    {
            bool fileExists = true;

            try {
                    StorageFile^ file = t.get();
            }
            catch(Platform::Exception^ exp)
            {
                    fileExists = false;
            }

            return (fileExists);
    });
}

And you should call it like below.

Testme("hello.txt").then([this](concurrency::task<bool> t)
{
    auto dispatcher = Windows::UI::Core::CoreWindow::GetForCurrentThread()->Dispatcher;

    // dispatch the task of updating the UI to the UI task not to run into exception
    dispatcher->RunAsync(Windows::UI::Core::CoreDispatcherPriority::Normal,
        ref new Windows::UI::Core::DispatchedHandler(
        [=]()
    {
        bool exists = t.get();

        if (exists)
        {
            txtbFileExists->Text = L"File is there";
        }
        else
        {
            txtbFileExists->Text = L"File is NOT there";
        }

    }));

});

I do not know where local folder is so I could not test the condition in which the file is actually there. Please test and see.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks so much for sharing your experience. Sounds so similar to what I am experiencing. I tried deselecting like you said and I still get the exact same error. Maybe on a real device it would behave differently. –  Tinkerbell Feb 3 '13 at 16:23
    
I updated my answer with a sample code to suggest an approach for you to resolve your problem. –  Gökhan Şengün Feb 3 '13 at 18:03
1  
Tried the code in WP8. Indeed it works like a charm. Can you please further explain the async issue. In my code, the method GetFileAsync() is executed at some point. Are you saying that at that point the catch is too late? Meaning, when the async task is executed, the try catch is not there, so to say? –  Tinkerbell Feb 4 '13 at 13:55
    
Exactly, you are creating a task to accomplish something but you are not waiting its completion to check the result and catch the exceptions. However it is also hard for me to explain the positive case - the case the file is actually there. I was expecting to get a nullptr instead of correct StorageFile reference. I guess - for positive case - your function is returning two times. one with nullptr and the other with correct ref to StorageFile. The second occurs last and prevails. For negative case, an exception occurs and nobody is there, so code finds nobody to throw exception and complains. –  Gökhan Şengün Feb 4 '13 at 15:05
    
Thanks so much for your help! The error handling was driving me nuts. I knew I was doing it right, after all, the code worked. Now it all falls in place. –  Tinkerbell Feb 4 '13 at 15:16

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